Thomas Sharrock Lower

M, b. 15 November 1827
  • Thomas Sharrock Lower was baptized on 15 November 1827 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of Jonathan Cundy Lower and Clarinda Sharrock.
  • At the time of the 7 June 1841 census Thomas Sharrock Lower was living in the household of Clarinda Sharrock in St Mawes, Cornwall. Clarinda as the 45 year old wife of a mariner, living with her children Mary15, Thomas 13, Matthew 10, and William 8.
  • At the age of 23 years, 5 months and 19 days, Thomas Sharrock Lower married Elizabeth Lower, daughter of John Lower and Jennifer Unknown, on 4 May 1851 in St Just in Roselands, Cornwall. Thomas was shown as a bachelor, a seaman living at St Mawes. Jonathan C Lowry (should be Lower), also a seaman.
    Elizabeth was a spinster, living at St Mawes, her father was John Lower, a seaman. Witnesses to the marriage were Charles Lower and M Elizabeth Lower.

Ursula Lower

F, b. 21 March 1773
  • Ursula Lower was baptized on 21 March 1773 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • She was the daughter of Stephen Lower and Catherine Roberts.
  • At the age of 29 years, 10 months and 11 days, Ursula Lower married George Dowrick on 1 February 1803 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall. They were both of the parish and were married by banns, they signed with their mark. Witnesses were Matthew Jenking and Joseph Pascoe.

Wilfred Lower

M, b. March 1877
  • Wilfred Lower's birth was registered in the Axbridge, Somerset Registration District in the March 1877 Quarter.
  • He was the son of Isaac Lower and Sarah Lissman.
  • At the time of the 3 April 1881 census Wilfred Lower was living in the household of Isaac Lower and Sarah Lissman in 4 Little Carlton Street, Weston Super Mare, Somerset. Isacc is shown as a 23 year old grocers porter, born Minehead, Somerset living with his wife Sarah 30, born Wellington Heath, Hereford and their four year old son Wilfred, born Weston Super Mare. A Thomas Clapp, 21, a fisherman born Tredegar, Monmouth, is lodging with them.

William Lower

M, b. March 1850
  • William Lower's birth was registered in the Axbridge, Somerset Registration District in the March 1850 Quarter.
  • He was the son of John Lower and Jane Bamfield.
  • At the time of the 7 April 1861 census William Lower was living in the household of John Lower and Jane Bamfield in St Mawes, Cornwall. John was a 45 year old pensioned coast guard, born St Maws, living with his wife Jane, 46 born Tregony, and their children Edward J a 13 year old scholar born Uphill, Somerst, William a 10 year old apprentice shoemaker born Uphill Somerset, Arthur an 8 year old scholar born Barrow, Somerset and Catherine Jane an 6 year old scholar born Barrow.
  • At the age of 24 years and 7 months, William Lower married Mary Kitt, daughter of Samuel Kitt, on 10 October 1874 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall. William is shown as a mariner, bachelor, father John also a mariner, living at St Mawes. Mary is a spinster of full age, living at St Mawes, father Robert KITT, a customers agent. Wintesses are Samuel KITT and Catherine Jane LOWER.
  • William Lower and Mary Kitt appeared on the census of 3 April 1881 in Well Lane, Falmouth, Cornwall. William is shown as a 32 year old mariner born Uphill Somerset living with his 30 year old wife Mary, born St Mawes and three year old son Edward John born Falmouth. A Frederick John Martin, 25 year old engineer born Falmouth is lodging with the family.
  • William Lower and William G Lower appeared on the census of 5 April 1891 in Marine Parade, St Mawes, Cornwall. William is shown as a 41 year old seas mariner, born Uphill, Somerset living with his wife Mary 39 born St Mawes and their children Edward J 13 born Falmouth and William 9 born Falmouth and James H 7 also born Falmouth.

Children of William Lower and Mary Kitt

William Lower

M, b. June 1849
  • William Lower's birth was registered in the Williton, Somerset Registration District in the June 1849 Quarter.
  • He was the son of Stephen Lower and Catherine Lower.
  • At the time of the 30 March 1851 census William Lower was living in the household of Stephen Lower and Catherine Lower in Quay Street, Minehead, Somerset. Stephen was a 30 year old coast guard boatman, born St Mawes Cornwall. He was living with his wife Catherine aged 29, born Cornwall and their three sons - John 6, Stephen 4, William 1 all born in St Maws Cornwall.

William Lower

M, b. 25 April 1832
  • William Lower was baptized on 25 April 1832 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of John Lower and Jennifer Unknown.

William Lower

M, b. 22 October 1833
  • William Lower was baptized on 22 October 1833 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of John Lower and Jennifer Unknown.

William Lower

M, b. 8 December 1832
  • William Lower was baptized on 8 December 1832 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of Jonathan Cundy Lower and Clarinda Sharrock.
  • At the time of the 7 June 1841 census William Lower was living in the household of Clarinda Sharrock in St Mawes, Cornwall. Clarinda as the 45 year old wife of a mariner, living with her children Mary15, Thomas 13, Matthew 10, and William 8.
  • At the age of 28 years, 9 months and 13 days, William Lower married Elizabeth Peters, daughter of William Peters and Mary Bellman, on 21 September 1861 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall. William is shown as a bachelor of full age, a mariner living at St Mawes. His father is shown as Jonathan Cundy (deceased), also a mariner. Elizabeth is a spinster of full age living at St Mawes. She is a dress maker daughter of William Peters a shipwright. Witnesses to the marriage are William Henry Jenkins and Margaret Peters.
  • William Lower and Elizabeth Peters appeared on the census of 2 April 1871 in New Street, Falmouth. William is shown as a 36 year old pilot born St Mawes, living with his wife Elizabeth 34, born St Mawes and children William J 10 scholar, born St Mawes; Edward X 8 born St Mawes, a scholar; Edith 4 born St Mawes and Lilla 1 born Falmouth.
  • William Lower appeared on the census of 3 April 1881 in St Mawes. William is show as a 47 year old mariner, head of the house, living with is children William J Lower, 19, an apprentice pilot born St Mawes; Edith, 13 a scholar born St Mawes and Lilla, 11 a scholar born Falmouth. His wife Elizabeth was living with her sister Margaret and brother in law William Jenkins.
  • Early in July 1881 William Lower attempted to murder his brother-in-law William Jenkins. The following articles appeared in the Falmouth Packet on July, 1881 -
    Attempted Murder at St Mawes (Falmouth Packet July 9 1881)

    On Tuesday evening a great sensation was caused at St Mawes by the attempted murder of a well-known inhabitant, Mr William Jenkins, a pilot, by his brother-in law, William Lower, a boatman who resides in the same place, and who fired at Mr Jenkins, in a public thoroughfare, with a revolver three different times. The report of the firing was heard by a great number of people and the would-be murderer was soon surrounded by a most indignant crowd. It appears that Lower has from time to time treated his wife very badly, and she has taken refuge in the house of Mr Jenkins, and lived with her sister. She had since left him and refused to return to live with him again, and Lower, being jealous, had sworn vengeance against Mr Jenkins who is a kind hearted man. According to his own confession, Lower intended to murder him for a long time past, and he went about it in the most deliberate manner. Mr Jenkins went to the Fowey regatta on Tuesday, as pilot in the Wotton, of which he is part owner; and on returning to St Mawes in the evening, and after the passengers had been landed, he was walking home about half past Ten o'clock, when Lower stepped out from a recess, where he had hidden himself, drew a revolver, and shot him in the head. The ball entered the forehead just above the eye, and came out a little higher up. Mr Jenkins though stunned for the moment, did not fall, but started to run, Lower following him, who fired two other shots, neither of which, however, took effect. After running about thirty yards, Mr Jenkins fell against Mrs Kendall of the Fountain Inn, who was standing at the door with her husband. The blood was flowing very copiously from the wound and Mrs Kendall was soon covered with it. An angry crowd surrounded Lower and one of the men took the pistol from him. Mr Harding, surgeon, St Mawes was sent for, and was on the spot in a minute or two, and attended to the sufferer, and the wound, it is said, is not likely to endanger life unless erysipelas supervines. PC Crewes, who heard the pistol shots, came up and took Lower into custody, and brought him at once to Truro, and he was lodged in the County Police Station between two and three o'clock the next morning.

    During the morning the prisoner was brought before Mr J Hendy, county magistrate, and charged with feloniously shooting with a certain revolver, loaded with gunpowder and five lead bullets, against one Wm Jenkins, with intent in so doing, thereby, feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought to kill and murder the said Wm Jenkins. PC Crews stated that he was on duty at St Mawes at about half past ten O'clock on Tuesday night, and heard three shots fired; he ran at once towards where the report came from, when he heard people shouting "There's a man shot", and calling for the police. When he came up the prisoner was standing in the mist of the crowd, and witness took him into custody and charged him with shooting at Wm Jenkins with a revolver, with intent to murder. Witness cautioned him as to what he should say in reply, but he said "I done it; I hope he is dead; I intended to do it this long time". Witness produced the five-barrelled revolver, which had been handed to him by a man name Wm James Thomas, who said in the prisoners presence "I took it from him". Witness examined the revolver and found three chambers empty and the other two chambers loaded with bullets. He found seven bullets in the prisoner's pocket of the same description as those extracted from the revolver.
    The prisoner was remanded to the 14th inst. Supt. Marshall acted as prosecutor.

    Attempted Murder at St Mawes (Falmouth Packet July 16th 1881)

    MAGISTERIAL EXAMINATION
    At the South Powder Petty Sessions, held at Truro on Thursday before Mr James Hendy, William Lower, mariner, St Mawes, was charged with having, on July 5th feloniously shot at William Henry Jenkins, a pilot, his brother-in law, with intent, and with malice aforethought, to kill and murder him.

    William Henry Jenkins stated that he was a pilot, and had lived at St Mawes for many years. The witness also resided there. Witness and Lower had married two sisters, and between the prisoner and his wife there had frequently been differences. He on one occasion deserted her, and was brought before the magistrates, but witness acted as peacemaker, and they lived with each other with occasional separations, until about five months since, at that time Lower's wife again left him in consequence of his conduct towards her and came to witness' house, where she resided for a short time, and then went to live with her mother and sister. Witness worked in No 2 Pilot Boat, and prisoner sailed with him up to about two month since, when he was dismissed for drunkenness. Since then the witness had frequently met the prisoner, and four or five weeks ago the latter asked him to see his wife and request her to send down the message she had promised. Witness attempted to convey the message but should not do so and went to the prisoner's house and told him so. They then walked down to the quay with Lower's son and Lower said the boy should never live "to pay that whore's debts", referring to his wife. This occurred on Saturday night, and he said he should call witness at five o'clock on the following morning, having previously intimated that he would "Do for the boy". Witness saw him at six o'clock the following morning and he said "I haven't done it; but never mind". They had frequently met since then and had short conversations. On Tuesday the 5th witness went in the steamer Wotton to Fowey regatta with his wife, prisoner's wife and her sister and mother. They returned to St Mawes about 9.30 in the evening and landed the St Mawes passengers and then went to Falmouth, finally returning about 10.30. From the quay witness could either of three roads to his house, but having overheard two men on the quay saying that the prisoner had been using threats towards him he did not take his usual route, but went by way of Collet' lane. The lane entered by wide steps, and witness had gone up two of them and had his foot on the third, when a shot was fired from a porch opposite, and a bullet struck him over the right eye. He turned towards the porch and threw his stick in that direction, exclaiming, "Oh! You Villain"! Prisoner then came out of the porch and fired another shot, and witness cried out "Lower has murdered me" and began to run. He looked back and saw prisoner following him, and immediately the latter fired a third shot, which witness heard whistle past. Lower still followed him until he came to Mr Kendall's public house about 60 yards from where the first shot was fired. Mr and Mrs Kendall were standing in the door, and witness, from exhaustion, fell into Mr Kendall's arms. Meanwhile the steamboat's crew had followed him from the quay. A doctor was sent for, and witness had been under his treatment ever since. He lost a quantity of blood. Prisoner had no questions to ask.

    John Sparks, marine engineer, William Kendall, licensed victualler, and William James Thomas, sail maker, also gave corroborative evidence.

    PC Cruse, St Mawes, stated that he heard people calling for the police and stating that a man had been shot. He found Lower in the midst of a crowd, and he charged him with shooting at Jenkins with intent to murder. He said, "I have done it I hope he is dead. I intended doing it this long time". He found seven bullets in the pocket of prisoner who was perfectly sober. He then brought the prisoner to Truro in custody.

    Dr Henry Harden St Mawes, proved being called on the evening of the 5th inst to see Jenkins, who was bleeding profusely from a wound in the forehead. The prosecutor had a very narrow escape and he was suffering a great deal from shock. He had been under his care ever since. The wound was such as could be caused by the bullet produced. Prisoner was then committed for trial at the Bodmin Assizes.

    Cornwall Summer Assizes - Attempted Murder at St Mawes (Falmouth Packet July 30th 1881)

    William Lower, 47, seaman was indicted for shooting at William Henry Jenkins, pilot St Mawes, with intent to murder him. The other count one into was a charge of shooting with intent to do grievous bodily harm. Mr St Aubyn MP prosecuted, assisted by Mr McCleod. Prisoner was undefended.

    William Henry Jenkins, Trinity House Pilot, residing at St Mawes, stated that he and prisoner, who was a mariner, also residing at St Mawes, married two sisters. Prisoner and his wife did not live very happily together, and had separated. On these occasions witness frequently acted as peacemaker. On the morning of 5th July witness went to Fowey regatta in the steamer Wotton. His wife, prisoner's wife, and her sister and mother, went with him and they returned to St Mawes about 10pm. When witness landed, in consequence of a conversation between two men he overheard, he did not go by the usual route but by way of Collett's land. He was proceeding up some broad steps forming the entrance to the lane, when a shot was fired from a doorway, the bullet striking him over the right eye, and glancing off the bone. He exclaimed "Oh you villain!" and threw his stick at the porch the direction in which he saw the flash. Immediately after the prisoner stepped out of the porch and fired another shot which missed him. Witness then shouted out "Lower has murdered me," and ran down the steps.

    Corroborative evidence as to hearing the shots and seeing the prisoner pursuing Jenkins with a pistol in his hand was given by John Sparks, engineer of the Wotton; Wm Kendall, licensed victualler, St Mawes and WJ Thomas, sailmaker St Mawes.
    PC Crews, St Mawes, state that he apprehended the prisoner and charged him with attempting to murder Jenkins. Witness cautioned the prisoner and he replied, "I intended to do it, I hope he is dead. I have intended doing it this long time". Witness found seven cartridges on the prisoner all filling the revolver produced.

    By the judge: Prisoner was perfectly sober.

    Mr Henry Harding, surgeon St Mawes, was called to see Mr Jenkins on the night in question, and he noticed the bullet mark over his eye, about three quarters of an inch above the eyebrow, and another hole about two inches distant where the bullet had appeared to have passed out. There was no doubt that the wound might have been caused by bullets like those found on the prisoner. If the bullet had struck Jenkins and inch lower the wound must have been fatal.

    Prisoner put in the following written statement:- For years past I have been subjected to a system of annoyance. My wife has neglected the children, spent my money, run me into debt, and wasted most of her time at William Jenkins house. I have often remonstrated with him about this, but to no purpose, believing as I did, and do still, that he is largely the cause of her thus neglecting her children, and wasting time and money. On the night in question, being on the quay, I heard Jenkins talking behind me, and I went across the quay towards Middle Lane, hoping to avoid him as he was walking towards Kendall's house at the time. But he changed his direction and came after me, and as he was close behind me, on reaching Middle lane, I turned into a porch to let him pass. Just at that moment it came into my head to frighten him. No sooner said than done. I drew out a pistol that I had been carrying for some weeks previously, and, as I thought, fired over his head. He ran away and I followed, firing two more shots in the direction of the sea, a totally different direction from that in which he was running. Thomas then came behind me and took hold of me around the two arms and tried to take the pistol from me. I said to him "Mind the pistol, there are two charges in it now; I have not hurt any person and I do not want to hurt any person".

    His Lordship, in summing up, said he would leave it to the Jury to decide what were a man's intentions if he fired three times with an instrument which his lordship was sorry to say was coming so much into use, and was scarcely ever used for any good purpose at a man, hitting him once, one of the bullets whizzing past his ear, and another, the witness thought, passing between his legs? Neither bullet appeared to have been guided above Jenkins head. What inference could they draw when a man fired three times in the direction of which the witness spoke, and who used the expressions the policeman said he did?

    The jury, after a few seconds' deliberation, found the prisoner guilty of the first count with firing with intent to murder. Prisoner in reply to the usual question, said it was not his intention to shoot Jenkins; he only wanted to frighten him. His children were starving through the prosecutor, and he had had nothing but bread for a fortnight, and there was no fire in his house when he committed the deed.

    His lordship said it was a grievous thing to find a man in the prisoners' position, but he had not the least doubt that the verdict of the jury was quite right. Had it not been for a providential intervention, and no thanks to the prisoner, he would have been standing there on trial for his life. If Mr Jenkins had died, nothing would have saved him from the gallows; he must have sentenced him to death, and it would have been carried out. Still he was guilty of a very grave offence; he was guilty of murder as far as intention could make him guilty, and though he had taken into consideration everything that could be urged in favour, he must pass a long sentence. He was liable for his offence to be sentenced to penal servitude for life, but he would be sentenced to penal servitude for 15 years.
    Prisoner seemed quite overcome by his sentence, and made some incoherent observations towards the prosecutor to the effect that he had disturbed him and his wife and family.
  • He appeared on the census of 5 April 1891 in HM Convict Prison, Gillingham. He is shown as William LAWLER.

Children of William Lower and Elizabeth Peters

William Lower

M, b. 17 March 1737
  • William Lower was baptized on 17 March 1737 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of John Lower and Joan Williams.

William Lower

M, b. 29 April 1759
  • William Lower was baptized on 29 April 1759 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of James Lower and Phillipa Condy.
  • At the age of 23 years, 1 month and 11 days, William Lower married Elizabeth Dowrick on 9 June 1782 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall. They were both of the parish and were married by banns, they signed with their mark. Witnesses were Mark Tiddy and William Pasco.
  • William Lower appeared on the census of 7 June 1841 in St Mawes. William was shown as a 60 year old fisherman living with Susan Pascoe, 50, and Thomas Pascoe a 25 year old shoemaker and Lucy Pascoe also 25 years old. All were born in Cornwall.

Children of William Lower and Elizabeth Dowrick

William Lower

M, b. 29 January 1815, d. between 1846 and 1851
  • William Lower was baptized on 29 January 1815 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of James Lower and Mary Tidd.
  • His marriage, at 31 years and 4 months, to Patty Walwell Bellman, daughter of Henry Bellman, was registered in the June 1846 Quarter in Truro, Cornwall Registration District.
  • William Lower died between 1846 and 1851. Patty was shown as a widow on the 1851 Census.

William Lower

M, b. 28 March 1784
  • William Lower was baptized on 28 March 1784 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of William Lower and Elizabeth Dowrick.
  • William Lower appeared on the census of 7 June 1841 in St Mawes. William as a 55 year old fisherman, living with Elizabeth Lower, 55 a net braider and Catherine Lower, a 40 year old net braider - most likely his sisters.

William Lower

M, b. circa 1780
  • William Lower was born circa 1780.
  • William Lower married Martha Unknown circa 1801.

Children of William Lower and Martha Unknown

William Lower

M, b. 20 February 1803

William Lower

M, b. circa 1770
  • William Lower was born circa 1770.
  • William Lower married Elizabeth Unknown circa 1791.

Child of William Lower and Elizabeth Unknown

William G Lower

M, b. 1878
  • William G Lower was born in 1878 in Falmouth, Cornwall.
  • He was the son of William Lower and Mary Kitt.
  • William G Lower and William Lower appeared on the census of 5 April 1891 in Marine Parade, St Mawes, Cornwall. William is shown as a 41 year old seas mariner, born Uphill, Somerset living with his wife Mary 39 born St Mawes and their children Edward J 13 born Falmouth and William 9 born Falmouth and James H 7 also born Falmouth.

William James Lower

M, b. 26 October 1862
  • William James Lower's birth was registered in the an unknown place , an unknown place Registration District in the December 1861 Quarter.
  • He was baptized on 26 October 1862 in St Just in Roseland, Cornwall. His father was a mariner living at St Mawes at the time of her baptism. William was baptized the same day as his sister Edith.
  • He was the son of William Lower and Elizabeth Peters.
  • At the time of the 2 April 1871 census William James Lower was living in the household of William Lower and Elizabeth Peters in New Street, Falmouth. William is shown as a 36 year old pilot born St Mawes, living with his wife Elizabeth 34, born St Mawes and children William J 10 scholar, born St Mawes; Edward X 8 born St Mawes, a scholar; Edith 4 born St Mawes and Lilla 1 born Falmouth.
  • At the time of the 3 April 1881 census William James Lower was living in the household of William Lower in St Mawes. William is show as a 47 year old mariner, head of the house, living with is children William J Lower, 19, an apprentice pilot born St Mawes; Edith, 13 a scholar born St Mawes and Lilla, 11 a scholar born Falmouth. His wife Elizabeth was living with her sister Margaret and brother in law William Jenkins.

Adelia Mary Lowien

F, b. 1907

Alfred Lowien

M, b. 13 November 1908, d. 12 March 1993
  • Alfred Lowien was born on 13 November 1908 in Coalbank, Queensland.
  • He was the son of August Lowien and Pauline Kajewski.
  • At the age of 27 years, Alfred Lowien married Alma May Naumann in 1936 in Queensland.
  • Alfred Lowien and Alma May Naumann appeared on the Electoral Roll between 1943 and 1949 living at Coalbank. Alf was a labourer.
  • Alfred Lowien died on 12 March 1993 at age 84.
  • He was buried on 15 March 1993 in Crow's Nest Cemetery.

Alice Pauline Lowien

F, b. 1906

Anna Louisa Lowien

F, b. 20 December 1891, d. 1 March 1976
  • Anna Louisa Lowien was born on 20 December 1891 in Bergen, Queensland.
  • She was the daughter of August Lowien and Pauline Kajewski.
  • At the age of 18 years, 5 months and 12 days, Anna Louisa Lowien married Francis Walter (Walter) Gillies, son of Francis Gillies and Mary Robinson, on 1 June 1910. They were married at Emu Creek at his parent's home.
  • Anna Louisa Lowien appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1913 living at Mountain Camp, Crow's Nest. She carried out home duties. Her husbane Walter did not appear on the roll.
  • She and Francis Walter (Walter) Gillies appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1930 living at Thornville. Walter was a farmer. His address was Hopefield, Bum Bum Creek.
  • Anna Louisa Lowien and Francis Walter (Walter) Gillies appeared on the Electoral Roll between 1936 and 1943 living at East Cooyar. Francis was a farmer. Their daughter Evelyn and Irene also lived at East Cooyar. Sons Sydney, Clarence and Herbert farmed at East Cooyar.
  • On 11 March 1944,her husband, Francis Walter (Walter) Gillies died in Queensland at age 60.
  • Anna Louisa Lowien appeared on the Electoral Roll with Elinor Davis and Herbert Francis Gillies between 1949 and 1972 in East Cooyar. Herbert was a farmer.
  • Anna Louisa Lowien died on 1 March 1976 in Queensland at age 84.
  • She was buried on 4 March 1976 in Crow's Nest Cemetery. Francis and Annie's gravestone reads-
    in loving memory of my dear husband oand our father francis walter gillies 1883-1844 "at rest" our dear mother Annie louisa gillies 1891-1976.

Children of Anna Louisa Lowien and Francis Walter (Walter) Gillies

Annie Christina Lowien

F, b. 1894, d. 1978

August Lowien

M, b. 26 April 1866, d. 2 May 1944
  • August Lowien was born on 26 April 1866 in Gross Teschendorf (Cieszyno), Prussia.
  • He was the son of Gottfried Lowien and Louisa Tabel.
  • August Lowien immigrated on 18 January 1877 to Maryborough, Queensland, with Gottfried Lowien and Louisa Tabel. Gottfried aged 38, Anna? (Louisa) aged 39? and their three sons Carl, 12, August 10, and infant Frederick travelled from Hamburg on the Lammershagen.
  • In 1878August Lowien 's parents Gottfried Lowien and Louisa Tabel settled in Meringandan
    ; Gottfried was amongst the first settlers to select land there.
  • At the age of 21 years, 7 months and 26 days, August Lowien married Pauline Kajewski, daughter of Carl Michael Kajewski and Juliana Gerofski, on 22 December 1887 in Glencoe, Queensland. The couple settled in the Glencoe area but later moved to Djuan and Coalbank.
  • On 24 March 1898,August Lowien's daughter, Unnamed Lowien was buried in Goombungee Cemetery.
  • In 1901 August was listed as a farmer of Goombungee in the Crow's Nest Post Office Directory.
  • August Lowien appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1903 living at Goombungee. He was a farmer. Charles (Carl) Lowien was also a farmer at Goombungee.
  • He and Pauline Kajewski appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1925 living at Coalbank. August was a farmer and Pauline carried out home duties.
  • August Lowien and Pauline Kajewski appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1930 living at Coalbank. August was a farmer. Their daughter Mary Ann carried out home duties and sons Herbert and Alfred were also farmers at Coalbank.
  • August Lowien and Pauline Kajewski appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1934 living at Coalbank. August was a farmer and Pauline carried out home duties. Their son Herbert was also a farmer as was Reginald. Mary Anna carried out home duties.
  • August Lowien and Pauline Kajewski appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1943 living at Crow's Nest. August was a farmer. Pauline and daughter Mary carried out home duties.
  • August Lowien died on 2 May 1944 in Queensland at age 78.
  • He was buried in Crow's Nest Cemetery.

Children of August Lowien and Pauline Kajewski

Beryl Joyce Lowien

F, b. 1921, d. 9 November 1921
  • Beryl Joyce Lowien was born in 1921.
  • She was the daughter of Edward (Ned) Lowien and Ethel Hohnke.
  • Beryl Joyce Lowien died on 9 November 1921 in Queensland.
  • She was buried on 10 November 1921 in Drayton & Toowoomba Cemetery.

Carl (Charles) Lowien

M, b. 5 June 1864, d. 16 January 1942
  • Carl (Charles) Lowien was born on 5 June 1864 in Gross Teschendorf (Cieszyno), Prussia.
  • He was the son of Gottfried Lowien and Louisa Tabel.
  • Carl (Charles) Lowien immigrated on 18 January 1877 to Maryborough, Queensland, with Gottfried Lowien and Louisa Tabel. Gottfried aged 38, Anna? (Louisa) aged 39? and their three sons Carl, 12, August 10, and infant Frederick travelled from Hamburg on the Lammershagen.
  • In 1878Carl (Charles) Lowien 's parents Gottfried Lowien and Louisa Tabel settled in Meringandan
    ; Gottfried was amongst the first settlers to select land there.
  • At the age of 21 years, Carl (Charles) Lowien married Anna Catharina Lucht, daughter of Johann Frederick Ludwig Lucht and Sophia Christina Dorothea Michaelis, in 1886 in Queensland. They lived at Meringandan for some years before becoming some of the first settlers at Doctor's Creek where their nine children were born. They planted corn, after tilling the ground by hoe. Produce that survived the marauding birds, was taken to Meringandan by German wagon.
  • Carl (Charles) Lowien and Anna Catharina Lucht appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1903 living at Goombungee. Charles (Carl) was a farmer and Annie carried out domestic duties.
  • When Carl and Annie Lowien's sons Bill and Fred was able to run the farm, Charles selected more land at Mossdale. They were both prominant members of the community, Charles being an elder of the Doctor's Creek Church and Annie a midwife.
  • Carl (Charles) Lowien died on 16 January 1942 in Queensland at age 77.
  • He was buried on 17 January 1942 in Goombungee Cemetery.

Children of Carl (Charles) Lowien and Anna Catharina Lucht

Carl August Lowien

M, b. 21 August 1899

Caroline Louise (Lena) Lowien

F, b. 28 October 1878, d. 7 October 1935

Children of Caroline Louise (Lena) Lowien and Johann Frederick Nothdurft

Charles William Lowien

M, b. 22 May 1919, d. 5 September 1983
  • Charles William Lowien was born on 22 May 1919 in Doctor's Creek, Queensland.
  • He was the son of William Lowien and Lillana Puschmann.
  • Charles William Lowien appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1943 living at Djuan. Charles was a farmer.
  • Charles William Lowien died on 5 September 1983 in Queensland at age 64.
  • He was buried in Kilcoy.

Charley Lowien

M, b. 1897

Edith Bertha Lowien

F, b. 6 November 1887, d. 4 November 1975

Children of Edith Bertha Lowien and Ludolf Spies