Florence Eyles

F, b. 2 December 1869, d. 6 September 1962

Florence Eyles 1869-1962, daughter of Charles Eyles and Selina Higgins
  • Florence Eyles was born on 2 December 1869 in Wairau, New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Charles Eyles and Selina Higgins.
  • At the age of 19 years, 1 month and 21 days, Florence Eyles married Fredrick Arthur Levy on 23 January 1889 in New Zealand.
  • Florence Eyles and Fredrick Arthur Levy were divorced. On 4 August 1899, the Marlborough Express reported:- Wellington, August 4. In the Divorce Court Judge Edwards granted a decree nisi in the case in which Mrs Florence Levy applied for the dissolution of marriage with Frederick Arthur Levy, of Sydney. At the first hearing His Honor said it appeared the husband was domiciled in Melbourne, and he was doubtful whether he had jurisdiction, but to-day he said he was satisfied he had jurisdiction.
  • At the age of 34 years, 4 months and 28 days, Florence Eyles married Anders Christian Knudson Hauberg on 30 April 1904 in New Zealand.
  • Florence Eyles was given as next of kin when her son Arthur Mervyn Levy joined the 3rd New Zealand Rife Brigade during WWI; At the time he was living at Solway, Masterton and gave his next of kin as his mother, Mrs C A Hanberg of Solway. He embarked from Welllington on 9 October 1915 for the Suez.
  • Florence Eyles lived in Brook Street, Nelson, at the time her son by her former marriage to Frederick LEVY was killed in France
    in 1916.
  • On 24 September 1934 Cantue and Florence purchased a double plot at the Wakapuaka Cemetery.
  • On 25 July 1944,her husband, Anders Christian Knudson Hauberg died in New Zealand.
  • Florence Eyles died on 6 September 1962 in New Zealand at age 92.
  • She was buried on 10 September 1962 in Wakapauka Cemetery, Nelson.

Child of Florence Eyles and Fredrick Arthur Levy

Florence Helen Eyles

F, b. 1892, d. 31 December 1923

Florence Eyles (daughter of Charles Eyles & Rose Helen Reid) 1892-1923. Photo thanks to Paul Jones

Child of Florence Helen Eyles

Child of Florence Helen Eyles and Arvid Marcus Leonard Falk

Frances Amelia Eyles

F, b. 1 October 1881, d. 31 January 1883
  • Frances Amelia Eyles was born on 1 October 1881 in New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Charles Eyles and Amelia Mytton.
  • Frances Amelia Eyles died on 31 January 1883 in Richmond, New Zealand, at age 1. Frances' death was announced in the Nelson Evening Mail :-Eyles- January 31. at Richmond. Frances Amelia Eyles the beloved daughter of Charles and Amelia Eyles of Dovedale aged 1 year and 5 months.
  • She was buried on 2 February 1883 in Richmond Cemetery.

Frederick Eyles

M, b. 29 July 1854, d. 10 September 1933
  • Frederick Eyles was born on 29 July 1854 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of William Eyles and Amelia Catherine Thorn.
  • At the age of 29 years, 6 months and 24 days, Frederick Eyles married Clara Martha Mytton on 22 February 1884 in New Zealand.
  • Frederick Eyles and Clara Martha Mytton lived in Takako, Nelson.at the time their son Alick died of wounds in Belgium on 29 October 1916.
  • On 7 March 1932,his wife, Clara Martha Mytton died in Motupipi, New Zealand.
  • Frederick Eyles died on 10 September 1933 in Motupipi, New Zealand, at age 79.
  • He was buried on 11 September 1933 in Rotoua Cemetery.

Children of Frederick Eyles and Clara Martha Mytton

Frederick William Eyles

M, b. 13 August 1865, d. 10 January 1957
  • Frederick William Eyles was born on 13 August 1865 in Wairau, Blenheim, New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Charles Eyles and Selina Higgins.
  • At the age of 21 years, 3 months and 14 days, Frederick William Eyles married Jane Hudson Melicen Clarke on 27 November 1886 in New Zealand.
  • At the age of 42 years, 6 months and 16 days, Frederick William Eyles married Mary Lucy Davis Freeman on 29 February 1908 in New Zealand. Their marriage was reported in The Marlborough Express Eyles—Freeman.—At Chatham Islands, on February 22nd, 1908, Frederick William Eyles, to Mary Lucy Davis Freeman, only granddaughter of the late John Davis, Port Underwood.
  • On 8 July 1946,his wife, Mary Lucy Davis Freeman died in Wairau, New Zealand.
  • Frederick William Eyles died on 10 January 1957 in Blenheim, New Zealand, at age 91.

Children of Frederick William Eyles and Mary Lucy Davis Freeman

Grace Margarita Eyles

F, b. 20 January 1911, d. 1963
  • Grace Margarita Eyles was born on 20 January 1911 in New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of William Daniel Eyles and Rebecca Alice Cobb.
  • At the age of 20 years, Grace Margarita Eyles married William Fred Cobb in 1932 in New Zealand.
  • Grace Margarita Eyles died in 1963 in New Zealand.

Harold Percy Arthur Eyles

M, b. 21 January 1886, d. 28 October 1951
  • Harold Percy Arthur Eyles was also known as Percy.
  • He was born on 21 January 1886 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Charles Eyles and Amelia Mytton.
  • At the age of 23 years, 4 months and 12 days, Harold Percy Arthur Eyles married Dora Florence Hope on 2 June 1909 in New Zealand.
  • On 20 February 1932,his wife, Dora Florence Hope died in New Zealand.
  • Harold Percy Arthur Eyles died on 28 October 1951 in Takaka, New Zealand, at age 65.
  • He was buried in East Takata Cemetery.

Harriet Eyles

F, b. 20 November 1850, d. 5 October 1933
  • Harriet Eyles was born on 20 November 1850 in Geelong, Victoria, Australia.
  • She was the daughter of Charles Eyles and Mary Ann Dunkley.
  • Harriet Eyles was christened on 1 December 1850 in Christ Church, Geelong, Victoria.
  • She immigrated on 22 December 1852 to Nelson, New Zealand, with Charles Eyles and Mary Ann Dunkley. Charles came from Melbourne, Australia in the Spray with his wife Mary Ann and daughters Elizabeth and Harriet. Charles was described as a 27 year old digger (he may have tried his luck at the gold fields). Mary Ann was 25.
  • At the age of 17 years, 8 months and 29 days, Harriet Eyles married Johann Heinrich Eberhardt, son of Anna Dorothea Eberhardt, on 18 August 1868 in Blenheim, Marlborough, New Zealand.
  • Harriet Eyles died on 5 October 1933 in Blenheim, Marlborough, New Zealand, at age 82.
  • She was buried in Omaka Cemetery, Blenheim, Marlborough.

Children of Harriet Eyles and Johann Heinrich Eberhardt

Henry Eyles

M, b. 17 November 1844, d. 4 December 1844
  • Henry Eyles was born on 17 November 1844 in Hobart, Tasmania.
  • He was the son of Charles Eyles and Mary Ann Dunkley.
  • Henry Eyles died on 4 December 1844 in Hobart, Tasmania.

Henry Charles Lawrence (Harry) Eyles

M, b. 19 January 1899, d. 19 November 1971
  • Henry Charles Lawrence (Harry) Eyles was born on 19 January 1899 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Charles Eyles and Louissa Margrater La Frentz.
  • Henry Charles Lawrence (Harry) Eyles died on 19 November 1971 in Napier, New Zealand, at age 72.
  • He was cremated in Hastings Crematorium.

Herbert Walter Eyles

M, b. 8 May 1910, d. 1 June 1983

Hester Eyles

F, b. 1854, d. 2 July 1935
  • Hester Eyles was also known as Ester Ann.
  • She was born in 1854 in Nelson, New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Charles Eyles and Mary Ann Dunkley.
  • At the age of 20 years, Hester Eyles married Frederick Philpott on 28 November 1874 in New Zealand.
  • On 15 June 1909,her husband, Frederick Philpott died in Blenheim, New Zealand.
  • Hester Eyles died on 2 July 1935 in Blenheim, New Zealand.
  • She was buried in Omaka Cemetery, Blenheim.

Children of Hester Eyles and Frederick Philpott

Hubert Philip Eyles

M, b. 15 August 1897, d. 29 February 1960
  • Hubert Philip Eyles was born on 15 August 1897 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Charles Eyles and Amelia Mytton.
  • Hubert Philip Eyles embarked on 26 July 1916 in Wellington for Devonport, England. He had enlisted with the 15th Reinforcements, J Company New Zealand Expeditionary Force. He was a Lance Corporal. His occupation was a labourer and he listed his mother, Mrs A Eyles of Thorpe, Nelson as his next of kin.
  • At the age of 22 years, 6 months and 2 days, Hubert Philip Eyles married Evelyn Esther Waghorn on 17 February 1920 in New Zealand.
  • Hubert Philip Eyles died on 29 February 1960 in Nelson, New Zealand, at age 62.
  • He was buried in Dovedale Cemetery.

Ida Emily Eyles

F, b. 7 February 1901, d. 1984

Isobel Alice Eyles

F, b. 4 May 1892, d. 3 September 1975
  • Isobel Alice Eyles was born on 4 May 1892 in New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of William Daniel Eyles and Rebecca Alice Cobb.
  • Isobel Alice Eyles died on 3 September 1975 in Porirua, New Zealand, at age 83.
  • She was cremated on 4 September 1975 in Karori Crematorium.
  • Isobel Alice Eyles also went by the name of Bell.

Ivy Grace Eyles

F, b. 2 May 1905, d. 11 July 1905
  • Ivy Grace Eyles was born on 2 May 1905 in New Zealand. She was a twin to Ada Alma.
  • She was the daughter of Charles Eyles and Louissa Margrater La Frentz.
  • Ivy Grace Eyles died on 11 July 1905 in New Zealand. Ivy's's death was announced in the Nelson Evening Mail along with that of her twin sister Ada:- DEATH. EYLES.—Eyles— On July 18th, 1905, at Harley- street, Nelson, Ivy Grace, twin daughter of Louisa and Charles Eyles, aged 11 weeks.
    Eyles.— On August 18th, 1905, at Harlcy-street, Nelson, Ada Alma, twin daughter of Louisa and Charles Eyles, aged 15 weeks.

Jane Eyles

F, b. circa 1825, d. 22 March 1891

Jane Eyles (1825-1891) - Nelder Version

  • Jane Eyles was born circa 1825 in Lasham, Hampshire, England.
  • She was the daughter of Daniel Eyles and Jane Primmer.
  • Jane Eyles immigrated on 24 September 1841 to Nelson, South Island, New Zealand, with Daniel Eyles and Jane Primmer. The Eyles family - Daniel 44, an agricultural labourer, Jane 44, Mary 23, a servant, William 18, and agricultural labourer, Jane 16 a servant, John 11, Benjamin 10, Ann 13 and Ezra 2 left from London on the Mary Ann, captained by Bolton arriving at Nelson NZ on 5 February 1842. They were part of the second fleet of ships commissioned by The New Zealand Company to bring settlers to the area around Nelson on the South Island of New Zealand. Their daughter Amelia's husband Thomas Cresswell was on the Whitby, part of the first fleet sent to settle Nelson. Ezra Eyles died on the voyage. The family encountered very hard conditions. They lived in a hut made of Manuka and clay while other families endured in houses consisting of four poles and a fern leaf roof. According to family hearsay one poor man was brought to the Eyles home and laid on the mud floor because his house was not weather proof. It is also said that Jane and her daughter Ann collected flat stones from the river, and using some clay Daniel had collected to plug holes in the wall, build an "oven around the wall and put in what they called on ship a boulli tin for a flue". That was the first chimney. Conditions were wet for the first few months and sickness was rife. Then when the New Zealand Company went broke food was scarce. Over a five week period they only had one loaf of bread in the house and could not purchase tea and sugar. If not for the potatoes they would have starved and Daniel found it difficult to find work. Anne had waited in line for more than an hour sometimes and then missed out at the bakehouse. The family didn't own the land but were squatters.
    The entry in the Embarkation Register for the family is Eyles, Daniel (wife Jane), agric labourer, 44; 3 boys 11,10,3; 1 girl 13. Mary servant 23; William agric labourer 18; Jane servant 16. Their address on the application register was Lasham. The family was recommended by a M Crowley.
  • Jane Eyles immigrated to Nelson, South Island, New Zealand, on 24 September 1841. The Eyles family left from London in the "Mary Ann", arriving at Nelson NZ in January 1842.
  • Jane Eyles married Thomas Bridgeman on 1 April 1843 in the Methodist Church, Nelson, New Zealand.
  • Between May 1843 and 1845 Jane Eyles and Thomas Bridgeman lived in Waimea, New Zealand.
  • Jane Eyles's and Thomas Bridgeman's first child Rebekah was born 1 February 1844 in Nelson, New Zealand.
  • On 17 February 1844 Thomas appeared on a jury list in Nelson. He was a joiner at the time and lived at Waimea.
  • Thomas Bridgeman left New Zealand aboard the Star of China on 18 June 1845 bound for Sydney. Jane and Rebecka were to follow later; He boarded the schooner "Star of China" at Port Nelson. It left for Australia on the 26th of May and arrived at Port Jackson. Jane & Rebekah departed from Port Nelson on the 26 September 1845 on the Comet. By the time she arrived in Sydney on 9 October Jane was almost eight months pregnant with their son Charles.
    During the four months it took for Jane to arrive in Australia, Thomas would have been looking for work. When Jane arrived it seems the family was immediately on the move again. Charles Walter Bridgeman he gave his place of birth as Gosswick (Gostwyck), New England when he married. Just how did the family get to Gostwyck from Sydney in the few weeks before his birth?
    Edward Gostwyck Cory (1799-1873) was granted over 2,000 acres of land fronting the Paterson River (in the Hunter Region) by Governor Brisbane in 1823. He had called this property Gostwyck. [Note: - Ironically the horse alleged stolen by William Gillis in 1851 belonged to Edward Cory]. Edward secured a second tract of grazing land near present day Uralla and about 20 km south of Armidale, which he also called Gostwyck. He quickly sold it to his partner William Dangar who in turn sold it to his brother Henry Dangar in 1832.
    How was it that Charles was born on 11 November, 1845 at Gostwyck, New England? A Richard Towns, who arrived in Sydney in March 1845, was bound to Henry Dangar in New England. His great, great grandson wrote: - “It is said that they travelled to Morpeth by boat, a trip which took about 11 hours, and then by horse and cart or bullock to New England, with the whole trip taking "almost a month".” A similar fate would have met Thomas and Jane. It does not seem possible that Jane travelled overland for “almost a month” and gave birth to Charles at Gostwyck in New England on 11 November 1845. Charles was then baptized three weeks later while his parents were living on the Clarence River. How did they make that trip in three weeks?
    It was possible, however, that Charles may have been born at the Gostwyck on the Paterson River as the property was accessible by boat via Newcastle and a journey from there to the Clarence River would only take a few days taking the coastal route. Wherever Charles was born, it is no doubt that his father had some connection to one of the Gostwyck properties.
    The family remained in the Clarence district, with Thomas working as a fisherman/carpenter from a houseboat according to family hearsay. When his daughter Jane was baptised in January, 1848 his occupation was given as a carpenter. At that time Grafton consisted of a small collection of building on the South side of the River. Further up the river, at Copmanhurst, the head of navigation, another settlement was being established. Thomas most likely travelled between the two settlements looking for work.
    An escaped convict Richard Craig had lead authorities who were interested in the great stands of cedar trees in the area, to the site of present day Grafton. He was a skilled bushman and in the 1830’s drove a flock of sheep from Ebor (between Armidale and Dorrigo) to The Settlement as Grafton was then known. In 1840 he bought 8,000 sheep down for J. R. Grose’s run at Copmanhurst. The sheep were ferried across the river on barge. His track through the bush to Grafton became known as the Craig Line, and was later used by many travellers. Was this how Thomas and Jane moved from Gostwyck near Uralla to Grafton?

    At some stage Thomas met George Kettel. George was the son of a William Kettel Esq, from Wateringbury in Kent. In 1841 George was granted a Depasturing License for the Moonbi run on the Peel River at Liverpool Plains (now on the main Highway between Tamworth and Armidale). The lease was later taken up by Henry Dangar (owner of Gostwyck, New England). On 1 November 1841, a Joseph Robinson was given a Ticket of Leave Passport 6 (41/485) to proceed to the Peel River under the service of Mr George Kettel on Moonbi and Tuckerman Sheep Stations near Tamworth. In 1847 George was at Peels River. He placed an advertisement in The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser advising that a horse had been lost or stolen from Peels River and that a reward of up to three pound would be paid for its return to either himself or Henry Dangar Esq.

    On 19 September 1848 The NSW Government Gazette advertised that Henry Dangar had claimed the lease of the Moonbi run. The run had grazing capacity for 8,000 sheep. The description of the run included a comment about “the hut occupied by Mr George Kettel”. Also in 1848, Henry Dangar’s brother John took up the Wallan run near present day Drillham on the Darling Downs. Perhaps as early as 1849, George Kettel took up the lease on Bogandilla Station, on the Darling Downs. Some references state it was part of the Wallan run, then owned by John Dangar. George would have needed to move his sheep from the Moonbi run since the lease was now owned by Henry Dangar. Family hearsay has it that “when Charles was about 5 years old his family in partnership with a Sea Captain Kettle took a flock of sheep and settled on land at Dulacca near Miles”. [Charles would have been four in early 1850]. Just what role Thomas Bridgeman played in this arrangement is uncertain. Certainly Thomas’s carpentry skills would have been valuable in establishing shelter for the party when they arrived at the station. But did he have his own flock of sheep? Making arrangements for such a trip would have taken some time and most likely involved acquiring a number of drays to carry food and goods. The Bridgeman family would have travelled to New England the quickest route being via the Craig Line. Perhaps the party made their arrangements for the trip at Gostwyck near Uralla, since the station was the largest in the region and certainly larger than George Kettel’s hut on Moombi. Kettle also had a close association with Henry Dangar, the owner of Gostwyck. Could this stay have left an impression on young Charles – who later stated he was born there?

    The most logical route for George Kettle to follow to Bognadilla near present day Dulacca, would have been via the water courses to ensure a good water supply for the sheep. After leaving Moombi the flock would have travelled to Gostwyck and then north. One possible route would have been to follow the Macintyre River from around what is now Inverell into Queensland (then NSW), and then its tributary Macintyre Brook. Frances Gillies was born at Meme , most likely a station on Macintyre Brook around present day Inglewood on 10 August 1850. It is possible that he was born during the trip north with George Kettel, meaning Jane would have made the overland trip during the latter stages of her pregnancy. From Macintyre Brook the flock may have reached Bogandilla in the spring of 1850 via the Condamine River. There was a Mihi Station close to Gostwych at Uralla.

    At some point during the family’s travels Rebecka died. No record of her death on the Clarence, during the overland trip or at Bogandilla has been found.
  • Jane Eyles and Rebekah Bridgeman immigrated on 9 October 1845. Jane & Rebekah departed from Port Nelson on the 26 September 1845 on the Comet. By the time she arrived in Sydney on 9 October Jane was almost eight months pregnant with Charles.
    During the four months it took for Jane to arrive in Australia, Thomas would have been looking for work. When Jane arrived it seems the family was immediately on the move again. Charles Walter Bridgeman he gave his place of birth as Gosswick (Gostwyck), New England when he married. Just how did the family get to Gostwyck from Sydney in the few weeks before his birth?
    Edward Gostwyck Cory (1799-1873) was granted over 2,000 acres of land fronting the Paterson River (in the Hunter Region) by Governor Brisbane in 1823. He had called this property Gostwyck. [Note: - Ironically the horse alleged stolen by William Gillis in 1851 belonged to Edward Cory]. Edward secured a second tract of grazing land near present day Uralla and about 20 km south of Armidale, which he also called Gostwyck. He quickly sold it to his partner William Dangar who in turn sold it to his brother Henry Dangar in 1832.
    How was it that Charles was born on 11 November, 1845 at Gostwyck, New England? A Richard Towns, who arrived in Sydney in March 1845, was bound to Henry Dangar in New England. His great, great grandson wrote: - “It is said that they travelled to Morpeth by boat, a trip which took about 11 hours, and then by horse and cart or bullock to New England, with the whole trip taking "almost a month".” A similar fate would have met Thomas and Jane. It does not seem possible that Jane travelled overland for “almost a month” and gave birth to Charles at Gostwyck in New England on 11 November 1845. Charles was then baptized three weeks later while his parents were living on the Clarence River. How did they make that trip in three weeks?
    It was possible, however, that Charles may have been born at the Gostwyck on the Paterson River as the property was accessible by boat via Newcastle and a journey from there to the Clarence River would only take a few days taking the coastal route. Wherever Charles was born, it is no doubt that his father had some connection to one of the Gostwyck properties.
    The family remained in the Clarence district, with Thomas working as a fisherman/carpenter from a houseboat according to family hearsay. When their daughter Jane was baptised in January, 1848 his occupation was given as a carpenter. At that time Grafton consisted of a small collection of building on the South side of the River. Further up the river, at Copmanhurst, the head of navigation, another settlement was being established. Thomas most likely travelled between the two settlements looking for work.
    An escaped convict Richard Craig had lead authorities who were interested in the great stands of cedar trees in the area, to the site of present day Grafton. He was a skilled bushman and in the 1830’s drove a flock of sheep from Ebor (between Armidale and Dorrigo) to The Settlement as Grafton was then known. In 1840 he bought 8,000 sheep down for J. R. Grose’s run at Copmanhurst. The sheep were ferried across the river on barge. His track through the bush to Grafton became known as the Craig Line, and was later used my many travellers. Was this how Thomas and Jane moved from Gostwyck near Uralla to Grafton?
    At some stage Thomas met George Kettel. George was the son of a William Kettel Esq, from Wateringbury in Kent. In 1841 George was granted a Depasturing License for the Moonbi run on the Peel River at Liverpool Plains (now on the main Highway between Tamworth and Armidale). The lease was later taken up by Henry Dangar (owner of Gostwyck). On 1 November 1841, a Joseph Robinson was given a Ticket of Leave Passport 6 (41/485) to proceed to the Peel River under the service of Mr George Kettel on Moonbi and Tuckerman Sheep Stations near Tamworth. In 1847 George was at Peels River. He placed an advertisement in The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser advising that a horse had been lost or stolen from Peels River and that a reward of up to three pound would be paid for its return to either himself or Henry Dangar Esq. On 19 September 1848 The NSW Government Gazette advertised that Henry Dangar had claimed the lease of the Moonbi run. The run had grazing capacity for 8,000 sheep. The description of the run included a comment about “the hut occupied by Mr George Kettel”. Also in 1848, Henry Dangar’s brother John took up the Wallan run near present day Drillham on the Darling Downs. Perhaps as early as 1849, George Kettel took up the lease on Bogandilla Station on the Darling Downs. Some references state it was part of the Wallan run, then owned by John Dangar. George would have needed to move his sheep from the Moonbi run since the lease was now owned by Henry Dangar. Family hearsay has it that “when Charles was about 5 years old his family in partnership with a Sea Captain Kettle took a flock of sheep and settled on land at Dulacca near Miles”. [Charles would have been four in early 1850]. Just what role Thomas Bridgeman played in this arrangement is uncertain. Certainly Thomas’s carpentry skills would have been valuable in establishing shelter for the party when they arrived at the station. But did he have his own flock of sheep? Making arrangements for such a trip would have taken some time and most likely involved acquiring a number of drays to carry food and goods. The Bridgeman family would have travelled to New England the quickest route being via the Craig Line. Perhaps the party made their arrangements for the trip at Gostwyck near Uralla, since the station was the largest in the region and certainly larger than George Kettel’s hut on Moombi. Kettle also had a close association with Henry Dangar, the owner of Gostwyck. Could this stay have left an impression on young Charles – who later stated he was born there?
    The most logical route for George Kettle to follow to Bognadilla near present day Dulacca, would have been via the water courses to ensure a good water supply for the sheep. After leaving Moombi the flock would have travelled to Gostwyck and then north. One possible route would have been to follow the Macintyre River from around what is now Inverell into Queensland (then NSW), and then it’s tributary Macintyre Brook. Frances Gillies was born at Meme , most likely a station on Macintyre Brook around present day Inglewood on 10 August 1850. It is possible that he was born during the trip north with George Kettel, meaning Jane would have made the overland trip during the latter stages of her pregnancy. From Macintyre Brook the flock may have reached Bogandilla in the spring of 1850 via the Condamine River. At some point during the family’s travels Rebecka died. No record of her death on the Clarence, during the overland trip or at Bogandilla has been found.
  • Being close neighbours to the Bridgeman’s at Bogandilla, William would have known of Thomas’ departure after the murder of George Kellel, and of his and non-return. He and the pregnant Jane travelled to Brisbane, perhaps in search of Thomas. Jane’s baby, a daughter named Catherine was born “under a dray” in Brisbane on 14 May 1854. On 2 July 1854, Jane’s three youngest children baby Catherine, Helen/Ellen and Frank were baptized. Perhaps because Jane was afraid their baptism would be refused if the clergy was aware that she was not married to William, they listed the children’s surnames as Gillis and William, a labourer of Brisbane, as the father. Jane and her family returned to Bogandilla Station. On 5 May 1855, “William advised James Bennett, the overseer of Ferrett's head station Walloon that he has seen an aboriginal called Dicky and about 30 other aborigines when he was at another station about seven miles from Bogandilla. Dicky was suspected of being in the group that had killed an earlier occupier of the station, a Mr Kettle. William warned Michael Byrnes and his wife of their danger and ordered the aborigines off the property. Less than 24 hours later both of the Byrnes’ were killed.” A daughter, Alice was born in Dalby in 1856 while William was still overseer at Bogandilla. At some stage the family left the station. William Patrick was born in September 1858 in Seven Mile Creek near Ipswich. William’s occupation was recorded as blacksmith aged 37 years (born 1821), born Limerick. Charles Gillis, a labourer, of Seven Mile Creek was the informant (most likely Charles Eyles who was then 13 years old so the information most likely was not accurate). By August 1861 they had returned to Bogandilla where Jane and William were finally married. Why did they delay their marriage until then? By law, a person could remarry if their spouse had been assumed dead for seven years. Did William and Jane marry wait until the seven years since Thomas left in 1854 had passed?

  • Again, according to family hearsay, “the family built a house on the property. They had a lot of trouble with aborigines ... one aborigine was very taken with young Jane Bridgeman who was a pretty child, and wanted to marry her .... he forced a fight with Mr Bridgeman twice and lost. Finally during a fight he (Bridgeman) was killed.... another version is that Mr Bridgeman died during a trip to Brisbane in order to record the land on which they had settled”. It is not known when Thomas Bridgeman left Bogandilla. George Kettel was killed by aborigines on 5 January 1854 “his head was split open while he was dipping a billy of water from the creek to make tea” The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser reported that two young aboriginals had been detained in connection with the murder. " Drayton, March 20 1854.—Since my last communication I have to inform you that two aboriginal natives have been arrested at Wallon, on a charge of cattle stealing, which natives have confessed that they were present at the murder of Mr. James George Kettel, of the Schanning, and at the taking away of his sheep; On Friday, the third of March, Mr. Ferrett sent down a messenger to Mr. Lester, J.P., of Terreyboo, for assistance, stating that there were strange blacks on his run, endangering the lives of his men, and likely to do him damage. Lieutenant Irving and Sub-Lieutenant Nicol, of the native police, were at Terreyboo at the time, when Mr. Nicol was immediately dispatched with six troopers. He returned on the Monday, bringing the two blacks in handcuffs, on a charge of killing and eating a bullock. These two men, who are both very young, and who have recently been in the employ of squatters in the neighbourhood, confess to have been present at the murder. There is, of course, no other evidence, nor could there be even if they were all arrested.—Correspondent of Englishman"
    Was it after George Kettel’s death that Thomas Bridgeman left Bogandilla to “record the land on which they had settled”? Did he leave Jane, four months pregnant on the station with the children Charles, Jane, Frank and Ellen (born 1852) and travel to Brisbane in early 1854? Whenever he left he did not return. He married Sarah McAdams in Adelaide on 23 October 1854.
  • On 13 December 1860 the Moreton Bay Courier published a list of Unclaimed letters for November- the name of Mrs Gillis of Seven Mile watering Hole was included on the list.
  • Jane Eyles married William Gillis, son of William Gillis and Mary Unknown, on 29 August 1861 in Bogandilla Station, Dulacca, Queensland, Australia.The marriage took place at Boggandilla Station where both Jane and William lived, William being an overseer of the station at the time. Witnesses were Charles Eyles (Charles Bridgeman aged 16) and Francis Eyles (Frank Gillies aged 11). Jane and William may have wanted the minister to believe that that Jane was single, and they didn't have several children between them. Hence Charles and Frances Eyles were Jane's brothers for the purpose of the marriage.
  • Jane Eyles and William Gillis selected land - in the parish of Meringandan on portions 923, 868 and 969 (280 acres in total) at Gowrie Little Plain where they built a house in the north-western corner of portion 923.
  • Jane Eyles's and William Gillis's last child Ida was born 15 November 1872 in Meringandan. William was the informant and said he was a 54 year old farmer born Limerick. His living children were listed as Charles 14, Ellen (Helen) 12, Catherine 10, Alice 8, William 6 and Agnes 4. COMPILERS NOTE: The children's ages and names are incorrect. Charles Bridgeman was 27 years old by then, Jane Bridgeman 25 was not mentioned, Francis 22 was not mentioned (may have meant to say Francis instead of Charles), Ellen was 20 not 12, Catherine 18 not 10, Alice 16 not 8, William was 14 not 6 and Agnes 10 not 4 - for some reason William took about 8 years off the ages of the children. Family hearsay has it that Ida may have been the child of one of Jane and Wiliam's daughters.
  • Jane Eyles witnessed the marriage of Francis Gillies and Mary Robinson on 20 November 1876; The ceremony was held at the bridegrooms parent's house (that of Jane and William Gillis) at Gowrie Little Plain near Meringandan. Frank's occupation was a farmer, Mary's assistant housekeeper. He was 25 and she was 22 and both gave their usual residence as Meringandan. When Frank signed the marriage register he signed his name a GILLIES instead of Gillis. The transcript of the marriage shows his parents, who witnessed the marriage, as William and Jane GILLIES also. Frank and his descendants have used that spelling ever since. Family hearsay has it that perhaps because Frank was not Williams child but Thomas Bridgemans he deliberately changed his name.
  • On 23 October 1882,her husband, William Gillis died in Gowrie Little Plain, Queensland. William died of an unknown cause and was buried by order of the Police Magistrate. His son William was the informant of his father's death and he was shown as 76 years old, a blacksmith, born Co. Cork and in the Colony for 35 years. According to William, William senior was married in Brisbane 35 years prior to his death. His children were listed as Frank 30, Ellen 28, Kate 26, William 23, Alice 21, Agnes 20 and Ida 10 (all of the children were actually 2 years older than this).
    The following article appeared in the Darling Downs Gazette dated 25th October 1882 "PAINFULLY SUDDEN DEATH - Through the courtesy of the police, we learn of the sudden death of Mr William Gillis, of Gowrie Little Plain. The sad event occurred about noon on Monday last. The deceased was in the act of stooping to pick up some nails when he fell over, and on being raised expired after a few moments in the arms of his son in law. The deceased who was much respected was about seventy years of age and leaves a widow and children and grandchildren. He had for a long period been a resident in the district."
  • Jane gave land to the west of the graves for the Gowrie Little Plain State school which opened in 1890. The teacher's house was built east of the school on portion 923. A church was built on portion 868 and opened in 1910.
  • Jane Eyles witnessed the marriage of Walter Wood and Ida Amelia Gillis on 15 April 1890 in Neil Street Methodist Church, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia; Walter was a plumber of Toowoomba and worked for the Public Works Department. Walter was a widower aged 29, his father a labourer, also named Walter and his mother Jane Douglas. The groom was born in Patrick, Glasgow, Scotland. Ida was a spinster aged 17 of Gowrie. Witnesses to the marriage were Sydney Keefer and Jane Gillis. Jane, as mother of the bride, gave her consent for the marriage.
  • Jane Eyles died on 22 March 1891 in Gowrie Little Plain, Queensland, Australia. Her cause of death was senile decay from which she had been suffering for 18 months. Dr Robers had been her Medical attendant. The informant of her death was her son-in-law John McGregor of Gowrie Little Plain. He stated her parents were Walter Daniel Eyles and Jane Hill and that she had been born in Somerset 63 years ago, having been 30 years in Queensland. Children of her first marriage were Charles Walter Bridgeman 43 and Gary 40 ? and of her second Francis 28, Ellen 26, Katherine 24, Alice 32, William Patrick 30, Agnes 28 and Edith 19 - obviously the ages for the first three children of this marriage are out by 10 years. She had two deceased children, daughters, by her first marriage.
  • She was buried on 23 March 1891 in Gowrie Little Plain, Queensland, Australia. She was buried with William in the corner of their property. Descendants later erected a memorial on the spot.
  • She left a will dated 5 February 1891 . She bequeathed her daughter Agnes, the wife of John McGregor eight cows, and her daughter Ida wife of Walter Wood eight cows also (to be selected after Agnes had chosen hers). She bequeathed her son William Patrick the threshing machine; her daughter Alice Anderson portion 969, parish of Meringandan (80 acres); her daughter Agnes McGregor portions 1928 and 973, parish of Meringandan (80 acres in total); forty pound each to Chalres Walter Bridgeman, William Patrick Gillis, Francis Gillis, Alice Anderson, Catherine Hill, and Jane Graham. The remainder of her estate was to be sold by her executors Francis Gillis and John McGregor and distributed equally between Charles Walter Bridegman, William Patrick Gillis, Francis Gillis, Alice Anderson, Agnes McGregor, Ida Wood, Catherine Hill, and Jane Graham. Her daughter Helen (Ellen) Burgess was not mentioned in the will.

Children of Jane Eyles and Thomas Bridgeman

Children of Jane Eyles and William Gillis

Jessie Eyles

F, b. 30 September 1887, d. 16 September 1895
  • Jessie Eyles was born on 30 September 1887 in New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Walter Nugent Eyles and Mary Thomas.
  • Jessie Eyles died on 16 September 1895 in Wairau, New Zealand, at age 7.

John Eyles

M, b. 1831, d. 15 January 1902
  • John Eyles was born in 1831 in Lasham, Hampshire, England.
  • He was the son of Daniel Eyles and Jane Primmer.
  • John Eyles was baptized on 2 February 1831 in Lasham, Hampshire, England.
  • At the time of the 7 June 1841 census John Eyles was living in the household of Daniel Eyles and Jane Primmer in Lasham, Hampshire. Daniel is shown as a 45 year old agricultural labourer, living with his wife Jane also 45, sons John 10, Ben 8, and Ezra 3, and daughter Esther(daughter of Elizabeth) aged 7.
  • John Eyles immigrated on 24 September 1841 to Nelson, South Island, New Zealand, with Daniel Eyles and Jane Primmer. The Eyles family - Daniel 44, an agricultural labourer, Jane 44, Mary 23, a servant, William 18, and agricultural labourer, Jane 16 a servant, John 11, Benjamin 10, Ann 13 and Ezra 2 left from London on the Mary Ann, captained by Bolton arriving at Nelson NZ on 5 February 1842. They were part of the second fleet of ships commissioned by The New Zealand Company to bring settlers to the area around Nelson on the South Island of New Zealand. Their daughter Amelia's husband Thomas Cresswell was on the Whitby, part of the first fleet sent to settle Nelson. Ezra Eyles died on the voyage. The family encountered very hard conditions. They lived in a hut made of Manuka and clay while other families endured in houses consisting of four poles and a fern leaf roof. According to family hearsay one poor man was brought to the Eyles home and laid on the mud floor because his house was not weather proof. It is also said that Jane and her daughter Ann collected flat stones from the river, and using some clay Daniel had collected to plug holes in the wall, build an "oven around the wall and put in what they called on ship a boulli tin for a flue". That was the first chimney. Conditions were wet for the first few months and sickness was rife. Then when the New Zealand Company went broke food was scarce. Over a five week period they only had one loaf of bread in the house and could not purchase tea and sugar. If not for the potatoes they would have starved and Daniel found it difficult to find work. Anne had waited in line for more than an hour sometimes and then missed out at the bakehouse. The family didn't own the land but were squatters.
    The entry in the Embarkation Register for the family is Eyles, Daniel (wife Jane), agric labourer, 44; 3 boys 11,10,3; 1 girl 13. Mary servant 23; William agric labourer 18; Jane servant 16. Their address on the application register was Lasham. The family was recommended by a M Crowley.
  • At the age of 27 years, John Eyles married Mary Driscoll in 1858 in Blenheim, New Zealand.
  • In October 1861 Mary brought charges against Henry Engham for assault. The case was dismissed by the Magistrates court.
  • On 1 August 1873,his wife, Mary Driscoll died in Golden Gully, Aorere, Takaka, New Zealand. She was suffering from bronchitis.
  • About 1875 John Eyles lived in Collingwood, New Zealand.
  • John Eyles died on 15 January 1902 in Nelson Hospital, Nelson, New Zealand. His death certificate shows he was a 70 year old farmer and died of Bright's Disease (kidney disease). He had been born in Hampshire, lived in New Zealand for 60 years, married Blenheim aged 30 to Mary Driscoll and had three surviving children M 34 F. 42,33.
  • He was buried on 17 January 1902 in Wakapuaka Cemetery, Nelson, New Zealand.

Children of John Eyles and Mary Driscoll

John Israel Eyles

M, b. 22 February 1860
  • John Israel Eyles was born on 22 February 1860 in New Zealand. He may have died as an infant.
  • He was the son of John Eyles and Mary Driscoll.

Judith Eyles

F, b. circa 1912

Lawrence William Eyles

M, b. 23 November 1893, d. 11 August 1917
  • Lawrence William Eyles was born on 23 November 1893 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of William Daniel Eyles and Rebecca Alice Cobb.
  • Lawrence William Eyles and Dorothea Maria Cortzen were engaged on 8 August 1914; Dora lived at Ranzau near Nelson. She wrote of her engagement in the back of her address book - Engaged to LWE on 8th August 1914


    She later married Alfred Kennedy Sloane in 1919.
  • Lawrence William Eyles embarked from Wellington to Plymouth on the "Ulimoroa" on 19 January 1917. He had joined the 21st Reinforcements Canterbury Battalion, C Company. He was a motor mechanic and listed his mother, Mrs Alice Eyles of Motueka Street, Nelson as his next of kin.
  • Lawrence William Eyles was killed in action on 11 August 1917 in Ypres, Belgium, at age 23.
  • He was buried in London Rife Brigade Cemetery, Belgium.
  • Lawrence William Eyles also went by the name of Laurie.

Lillian Amelia Eyles

F, b. 4 September 1867, d. 1935
  • Lillian Amelia Eyles was born on 4 September 1867 in New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of William Eyles and Amelia Catherine Thorn.
  • At the age of 20 years, 5 months and 23 days, Lillian Amelia Eyles married George Henry Allport on 27 February 1888 in New Zealand.
  • In 1913,her husband, George Henry Allport died in New Zealand.
  • At the age of 46 years, Lillian Amelia Eyles married George John Metcalfe in 1914 in New Zealand.
  • Lillian Amelia Eyles died in 1935 in New Zealand.

Children of Lillian Amelia Eyles and George Henry Allport

Lily Eyles

F, b. 19 April 1889, d. 1 July 1932
  • Lily Eyles was born on 19 April 1889 in Wairau, New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Walter Nugent Eyles and Mary Thomas.
  • At the age of 27 years, 11 months and 15 days, Lily Eyles married John Murray Gregg on 3 April 1917 in Blenheim, New Zealand.
  • Lily Eyles lived in St Andrew's Road, Blenheim, most likely with her parents, when her husband John Murray Gregg embarked for England during WWI on 26 April 1917.
  • Lily Eyles died on 1 July 1932 in New Zealand at age 43.

Lucy Louise Eyles

F, b. 29 December 1863, d. 1950
  • Lucy Louise Eyles was also known as Louisa.
  • She was born on 29 December 1863 in Wairau, Blenheim, New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Charles Eyles and Selina Higgins.
  • At the age of 32 years, 9 months and 14 days, Lucy Louise Eyles married Samuel Arthur James Timms on 13 October 1896 in New Zealand.
  • Lucy Louise Eyles died in 1950 in New Zealand.

Child of Lucy Louise Eyles

M(ale) Eyles

M, b. 4 July 1847, d. 11 July 1847
  • M(ale) Eyles was born on 4 July 1847 in Hobart, Tasmania.
  • He was the son of Charles Eyles and Mary Ann Dunkley.
  • M(ale) Eyles died on 11 July 1847 in Hobart, Tasmania.

Margaret Eyles

F, b. circa 1912

Marjorie Gladys Eyles

F, b. 19 September 1909, d. 1989

Martin James Eyles

M, b. 23 April 1901, d. 1984
  • Martin James Eyles was born on 23 April 1901 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Charles Eyles and Louissa Margrater La Frentz.
  • On 26 June 1918 the Dominion newspaper reported:-"MAGISTRATE'S COURT - ASSAULT ,UPON A GIRL
    YOUTH ADMITTED TO PROBATION. Mr. F. V. Frazer, S.M, heard the police cases in the Magistrate's Court yesterday. A charge of having assaulted a girl 12 years of age, on June 15, was alleged against a youthful sailor named Martin James Eyles, for whom Mr. .H. F. O'Leary appeared. Inspector Mursack, who prosecuted, in outlining the case, stated that the girl was staying at a boarding house in Hopper Street, and the young man was also living there at the time. The girl slept on a couch in the dining room, and on the night of the information, between 10 and 11 o'clock, she heard someone moving about the room. A few minutes later she was seized by the shoulders, upon which she screamed, and the man, who was alleged to be accused, decamped. It was afterwards found that the accused was not in his room, (but his boots and socks were there. About 1 o'clock in the morning accused was noticed to creep back to the house, and when questioned as to his actions, said, "What are you going to charge me with?" He made a second statement to the effect that he had felt uneasy during the night, and had gone down to the Basin Reserve. Inspector Mursack added that accused was seen returning to the house, but in a different direction from the Basin Reserve. After evidence had been heard in support of the charge accused declined to go into the witness box, but his counsel said it was quite evident someone took hold of the girl. Probably it was the youth, who was under the influence of liquor. His Worship said the evidence was so clear that only most complete explanation from the accused could have been accepted. Had accused been a grown man he would have regarded the offence as a very serious one, but he did not wish to send a boy of 17 to prison. There had been no attempt to interfere further with the girl, so he would deal leniently with the accused. "I hope I am not taking a serious risk with you," remarked His Worship to accused, "but you will be convicted and admitted to probation for two years." An order was also made prohibiting the accused from touching intoxicating liquor for a period of two years. "
  • On 29 December 1944 Martin Swain allegedly shot two people. The Auckland Star reported on 9 February 1945 "NAPIER SHOOTING-CHARGE OF MURDER-FURTHER EVIDENCE HEARD P.A. NAPIER, this day. Happenings in the Caledonian Hotel, Napier, and in the roadway in its vicinity on the afternoon of December 29 during which two persons were killed and three persons were seriously injured following the discharge of an automatic pistol, were further described before Mr. J. Miller, S.M., to-day, when the hearing was continued of the charges against Martin James Eyles, aged 45, seaman and waterside worker. Eyles was charged on two separate accounts of murdering Charles Edmund Swain, barman-porter at the Caledonian Hotel, and John Barry Bertram Howe, schoolboy, who was cycling near the hotel when he was shot. Three charges of attempted murder were laid, one concerning Thomas Rogers, who was in the bar of the hotel, and the other two concerning Detective-Sergeant Duncan McKenzie and Detective Andrew Reid, members of a police party, who were shot at while in a motorcar. The remaining two charges were those in which accused was charged with discharging a German Luger automatic pistol loaded with destructive materials with intent to do grievous bodily harm to Thelma Winnie Alcock, a pedestrian, who was wounded near the post office, and Henry James Kearney, an elderly journalist, who was wounded while sitting in the lounge of the hotel. The case for the Crown was conducted by Mr. L. W. Willis, Crown prosecutor, and Mr. H. W. Dowling appeared for accused. Bullet in Shopping Bag Inez Norah Kennedy, married woman, gave evidence concerning damage to a handbag and shopping bag which she was carrying in the street outside the post office on the afternoon of the shooting. A bullet was found the next day in the shopping bag. This she handed to the police.
    Cross-examined by Mr. Dowling witness said there was no possible reason she knew of why the accused should shoot at her.
    Henry Edgsworth Seed, record clerk, employed by the Land and Survey Department, said that on hearing three reports he looked out of a small window with a view of Hastings Street. Witness saw a man standing in the. centre of the footpath. He was pointing something at a boy riding a bicycle slowly along the road. The man lowered what he was handling and seemed to adjust some mechanism. Then he raised what afterwards proved to be a gun, took aim and levelled it at the boy. A shot rang out as the boy was turning into Dickens Street, and he seemed to utter a sharp cry. The boy fell off the bicycle just at the corner.
    A further eye witness of the shooting, Herbert Leonard Waters, sign writer, said that the boy turned round to look -at the man while he was loading. The man aimed at the boy, but the pistol did not go off. He seemed to fool around with the pistol and pointed it at the boy again. He heard a shot fired and saw the boy when he fell. The man walked away quietly. Witness followed the crowd and from a corner he could see the men. The man pointed the pistol two or three times towards the crowd. Stolen Pistol Identified Joseph Jeffares, excavator driver, identified a pistol, produced, which he registered in 1921. During the 1931 earthquake it and. 50 rounds of ammunition were stolen from his home, and he had not seen it until the police showed it to him last month.
    Evidence of having known accused for 15 to 20 years was given by James Forne, watersider. He was with accused in the Caledonian Hotel bar on the morning of December 29. Accused was known on the Napier waterfront as "Bromide" Eyles, because of his habit of taking bromide as a nerve steadier after being ill. Accused was in the habit of taking liquor every day, and witness had quite often seen him drunk. He then became erratic, irrational and domineering. A barman in the Caledonian Hotel, Philip Aubrey McCabe, said accused visited the bar nearly every morning, having about six or eight beers, usually alone. On the afternoon of the shooting Eyles was in the bar, with Rogers standing nearby, when Swain came in. Swain said: "Good afternoon, Mr. Eyles." Eyles then drew a pistol from his coat and shot Swain.
    Accused then "fanned" the pistol around the bar, pointing it at witness, who appealed to accused not to shoot. Eyles left the bar and went into the foyer, and witness heard another shot. There was no argument in the bar while Eyles was there, and there appeared to be no reason for the shooting. Other witnesses who were in the bar and the hotel at the time gave similar evidence. Under cross examination, William John Kyle, licensee of the Caledonian Hotel, said Swain and accused were friends. Witness believed Eyles was in the habit of lending Swain money to see him over to pay day. Swain had been ill recently, and Eyles had visited him in his room, taking him some fruit. Jack Frederick Neill, contractor, of Port Ahuriri, stated he was in the hotel on the afternoon of December 29. There were three men in the bar and one had a pistol in his hand. He fired the pistol at a man in a white coat. Mr. Willis: What did you do then? Witness: I took off. Witness outlined how he went into the post office and heard further shots. He came out of the post office and saw a boy lying in the street. He also saw the man with the revolver fire shots up Hastings Street. To Mr. Dowling, witness stated that it appeared that the man was not firing at anybody in particular just firing wildly.
    Struck by Bullets Thomas Rogers, retired, of Napier, stated that on Friday, December 29, he went into the public bar of the hotel shortly after 3 p.m.. The accused, whom witness knew fairly well, was in the bar, and witness was standing about eight feet on the accused's right. Swain entered the bar and stood between witness and the accused. Swain put a tray on to the bar and then "things happened." Witness said he felt something on his hand. He looked and saw Eyles pointing a pistol at Swain. A bullet which went through Swain hit witness in the hand and dropped at his feet Nothing happened in the bar to provoke Eyles. Accused did not appear intoxicated. Witness left the bar, and as he left he felt a shot in his arm and heard a report.
    Mr. Dowling: You and Eyles never had any rows? There was no reason why he should have shot you?
    Witness: No; no reason whatever"

    The Evening Post reported on 25 February 1943 -
    " TRIAL OF EYLES
    QUESTION OF LIQUOR
    THE ACCUSED'S CONDITION P.A. NAPIER, February 20

    The Crown case against Martin James Eyles, who is facing a double murder charge, was almost completed by the time the Court adjourned this evening. Mr. Justice Finlay is presiding. Mr. L. W. Willis and Mr. H. C. Sproule are appearing for the Crown and Mr. H. W. Dowling for the accused.
    Thomas Rogers, pensioner, aged 64, stated that in the bar Eyles presented a pistol and fired at Swain, the bullet passing through Swain's body and striking witness harmlessly on the arm before falling at his feet. Witness made a rapid exit, and Swain, who was just behind him, staggered and fell. Witness was leaving the hotel entrance when he was hit in the arm and wounded.
    Mr. Dowling: Had anything happened to give you reason to believe that he had any ill-feeling against you?— No.
    He had no reason for shooting you? —No.
    Eyles appeared to you in the bar to be sober?— Yes, reasonably so. I have seen him once or twice over the odds, but not on that occasion.
    Allen Berry, the accused's doctor, said that if a man was a consistently heavy drinker over a number of years he would suffer degeneration of the brain. He believed that a man complaining of seeing bright, flashing lights in the head, loss of memory, and hearing voices and footsteps when there were none, was suffering from alcoholic amnesia, which was forgetfulness over a period of time of what had happened. Such a person would do and say things of which afterwards he had no recollection. There were occasions known as alcoholic psychosis, meaning abnormality of conduct, and he could imagine anything. The witness said that a man suffering from alcoholic psychosis would be morally and legally responsible for what he was doing, because he could have an understanding of what was right and wrong. That would persist up to a point where he was suffering from delusions where he could be said to be suffering from temporary insanity. A man could shoot and then forget it, but witness could not say if, being in a state of amnesia, a man could appreciate the difference between right and wrong. To a question by Mr. Dowling, Senior Sergeant F. Forsythe said he believed Eyles when arrested was suffering from the effects of alcohol and was in a dazed condition in his cell. Witness noticed that Elyse’s eyes were glassy on the way to the police station. Eyles never spoke in a morose condition. POLICE EVIDENCE. Constable Ewen Rippin, who participated in the arrest of accused, said that when in the ambulance going to hospital Eyles said: "I had better be careful what I say. You'll remember and use it as evidence." The accused asked for a drink of water at the hospital, drinking four mugs of water. He then turned, and after walking a few steps, fell to the floor. The accused had a glassy look in the eyes, but witness could not say if he were unconscious. Constable Brian Nathan, who also assisted in the arrest, confirmed that accused's eyes were noticeably glazed Cross examined, he said accused appeared mentally fogged Mr. Dowling: What do you mean by that expression? Witness: He gave the impression that his mental faculties were impaired by over-indulgence in alcohol. James Dewar Hunter, superintendent of the Pokanui Mental Hospital said he examined the accused seven weeks after his arrest. He found the accused frank and co-operative in answering questions. In a report handed in by the witness the accused stated that from 1931-32 on he had had a feeling when walking behind people that he would like to jump on them and squeeze them. There were frequent references to drinking practices, after which he had woke up and found bruises received in brawls of which he had no recollection. The accused lent and borrowed money of which he had no recollection. From 1933 to 1938 he was boiling up concoctions of weeds from a garden. In 1943, he alleged, he had attempted suicide. He alleged that he also made liquor from fermented tomato jam. He complained of sleeplessness and severe headaches, and that he could not think clearly On December 20, between 2 am and 6 am., he had several drinks of rum . He recollected nothing between the hours of 11am and 5pm of that day. The witness said that he had based his opinions of the accused largely on what the accused had told him.
    Mr Willis. Was it possible that on this day he could do what he did and afterwards forget?
    Witness: With alcoholics all things are possible.
    The hearing will be continued tomorrow".
    Then in The Auckland Star on 23 February 1945 " NAPIER SHOOTING-CHARGES AGAINST EYLES CONSIDERATION DEFERRED P.A. NAPIER, this day. Three charges of attempted murder and two of discharging firearms with intent to do grievous bodily harm against Martin James Eyles, seaman and watersider. aged 45, who were sentenced earlier this week to life imprisonment on two counts of murder, have been deferred by Mr. Justice Finlay for consideration at the next session of the Supreme Court in Napier."
  • At the age of 59 years, Martin James Eyles married Doris Emily Neate in 1961.
  • On 19 October 1977,his wife, Doris Emily Neate died in New Plymouth, New Zealand, at age 79.
  • Martin James Eyles died in 1984 in New Plymouth, New Zealand.

Mary Eyles

F, b. 30 October 1818, d. 20 July 1888

Benjamin Eyles (1833-1881) and his sister Mary (1818-1888). Photo Courtesy of Helen Jennings

  • Mary Eyles was born on 30 October 1818 in Lasham, Hampshire, England.
  • She was the daughter of Daniel Eyles and Jane Primmer.
  • Mary Eyles was baptized on 22 November 1818 in Lasham, Hampshire, England.
  • She immigrated on 24 September 1841 to Nelson, South Island, New Zealand, with Daniel Eyles and Jane Primmer. The Eyles family - Daniel 44, an agricultural labourer, Jane 44, Mary 23, a servant, William 18, and agricultural labourer, Jane 16 a servant, John 11, Benjamin 10, Ann 13 and Ezra 2 left from London on the Mary Ann, captained by Bolton arriving at Nelson NZ on 5 February 1842. They were part of the second fleet of ships commissioned by The New Zealand Company to bring settlers to the area around Nelson on the South Island of New Zealand. Their daughter Amelia's husband Thomas Cresswell was on the Whitby, part of the first fleet sent to settle Nelson. Ezra Eyles died on the voyage. The family encountered very hard conditions. They lived in a hut made of Manuka and clay while other families endured in houses consisting of four poles and a fern leaf roof. According to family hearsay one poor man was brought to the Eyles home and laid on the mud floor because his house was not weather proof. It is also said that Jane and her daughter Ann collected flat stones from the river, and using some clay Daniel had collected to plug holes in the wall, build an "oven around the wall and put in what they called on ship a boulli tin for a flue". That was the first chimney. Conditions were wet for the first few months and sickness was rife. Then when the New Zealand Company went broke food was scarce. Over a five week period they only had one loaf of bread in the house and could not purchase tea and sugar. If not for the potatoes they would have starved and Daniel found it difficult to find work. Anne had waited in line for more than an hour sometimes and then missed out at the bakehouse. The family didn't own the land but were squatters.
    The entry in the Embarkation Register for the family is Eyles, Daniel (wife Jane), agric labourer, 44; 3 boys 11,10,3; 1 girl 13. Mary servant 23; William agric labourer 18; Jane servant 16. Their address on the application register was Lasham. The family was recommended by a M Crowley.
  • Mary Eyles witnessed the marriage of John Holdaway and Amelia Eyles on 7 August 1842 in Nelson, New Zealand; They were married the same day as Amelia's sister Mary to David Norgate.The marriage was most likely from necessity as John had four young children to care for and Amelia had two. They went on to have another 11 children. The certificate shows that John was a labourer born Lasham, a widower. Amelia was from Madshad (Medsted), a widow. They were married by Charles Waring, sexton. John signed with his mark as did Amelia. Present were Thomas Samuel Tidd, Elizabeth Tidd and Mary Norgate.
  • At the age of 23 years, 9 months and 8 days, Mary Eyles married David Henry Major Norgate on 7 August 1842 in Nelson, New Zealand. They were married the same day as Mary's sister Amelia and John Holdaway. David and Mary met on the voyage to New Zealand on the Mary Anne.
  • Mary Eyles died on 20 July 1888 in Stoke, Nelson, New Zealand, at age 69. Her death certificate showed she was 69 and died of paralysis. She had been born in Hampshire and had been in New Zealand 46 years. She was married in New Zealand at age 24 to David Norgate and had the following surviving children M. 29,31,33,41,45 F. 38,43.
  • She was buried on 23 July 1888 in Richmond Cemetery. Wesleyan Section.

Children of Mary Eyles and David Henry Major Norgate