Alfred William Primmer

M, b. 30 June 1844, d. before October 1867
  • Alfred William Primmer was baptized on 30 June 1844 in East Meon, Hampshire. His father William was a labourer of East Meon at the time.
  • He was the son of William Primmer and Elizabeth Mansbridge.
  • At the age of 21 years, 5 months and 11 days, Alfred William Primmer married Emily Eldridge on 11 December 1865 in East Meon, Hampshire. Alfred was a 22 year old seaman of Kingston, son of William Primmer, a labouerer. Emily (Scammels) was a 24 year old widow of East Meon, daughter of Henry Eldridge, a labourer. Witnesses were Henry Eldridge and Elizabeth Merritt.
  • Alfred William Primmer died before October 1867. Emily remarried on 24 October 1867 - she was a widow.

Alice Elizabeth Primmer

F, b. 29 January 1872, d. 10 November 1945
  • Alice Elizabeth Primmer was born on 29 January 1872 in Rangitikei, North Island, New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Benjamin Primmer and Sarah Tasker.
  • At the age of 24 years, 4 months and 9 days, Alice Elizabeth Primmer married Stephen Avery on 7 June 1896 in Motueka, Nelson, New Zealand.
  • Alice Elizabeth Primmer died on 10 November 1945 in Fielding, New Zealand, at age 73.
  • She was buried on 13 November 1947 in Feilding Cemetery.

Children of Alice Elizabeth Primmer and Stephen Avery

Alice Emily Primmer

F, b. 17 December 1855
  • Alice Emily Primmer was baptized on 17 December 1855 in East Meon, Hampshire. Her father was a labourer living at Riplington at the time.
  • She was the daughter of John Primmer and Ann Norman.
  • At the time of the 7 April 1861 census Alice Emily Primmer was living in the household of John Primmer and Ann Norman in North Mundham, Sussex. John was the 40 year old head, born East Meon. Ann was 29 years old, born East Meon. Their children Benjamin 7, Alice Emily 5 and Joseph John 2, were all born East Meon.
  • Alice Emily Primmer appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 in Sussex. She was a 16 year old domestic servant born Hampshire.
  • Her marriage, at 25 years and 11 months, to George Taylor was registered in the December 1881 Quarter Registration District.

Children of Alice Emily Primmer and George Taylor

Alice Mary Primmer

F, b. 24 September 1867
  • Alice Mary Primmer was baptized on 24 September 1867 in East Meon. She was the illegitimate daughter of Emily Primmer of Frogmore and Henry Merritt, labouer of Frogmore.
  • She was the daughter of Emily Eldridge.

Allan Jack Primmer

M, b. 29 February 1920, d. 30 June 1996
  • Allan Jack Primmer was born on 29 February 1920 in Christchurch, New Zealand. He was a twin to Daphne.
  • He was the son of Edgar Clarence Primmer and Lily Smith.
  • Allan Jack Primmer died on 30 June 1996 in Auckland, New Zealand, at age 76.

Amy Louisa Primmer

F, b. 3 December 1894

Ann Primmer

F, b. September 1839, d. 1842
  • Ann Primmer's birth was registered in the Petersfield, Hampshire Registration District in the September 1839 Quarter.
  • She was the daughter of Joseph Primmer and Ann Hurst.
  • Ann Primmer died in 1842.
  • She immigrated on 15 March 1842 to New Zealand with Joseph Primmer and Ann Hurst. Joseph 30, an agricultural labourer and Ann 24 travelled on the Bolton with their children Benjamin, aged 9 months and Ann 2. Ann died on the voyage.

Ann Primmer

F, b. 16 May 1868, d. 27 October 1886
  • Ann Primmer was born on 16 May 1868 in Surprising Valley, Upper Moutere, New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Benjamin Primmer and Sarah Tasker.
  • In June 1875 Annie was awarded first prize for the eighth class at Richmond School.
  • Ann Primmer died on 27 October 1886 in Nelson, New Zealand, at age 18.

Ann Primmer

F, b. 7 December 1828
  • Ann Primmer was baptized on 7 December 1828 in Hamble-le-Rice, Hampshire.
  • She was the daughter of James Primmer and Barbara Emery.
  • Her marriage, at 20 years and 11 months, to Samuel Ellifer was registered in the December 1849 Quarter Registration District.

Child of Ann Primmer and Samuel Ellifer

Annie Barbara Primmer

F, b. between April 1873 and June 1873
  • Annie Barbara Primmer was born between April 1873 and June 1873 in Hamble-le-Rice, Hampshire.
  • She was the daughter of James Primmer and Ann Light.

Annie Laura Primmer

F, b. December 1863
  • Annie Laura Primmer's birth was registered in the an unknown place , an unknown place Registration District in the December 1863 Quarter.
  • She was the daughter of John Primmer and Ann Norman.
  • At the time of the 2 April 1871 census Annie Laura Primmer was living in the household of John Primmer and Ann Norman in North Mundham, Sussex. John, 49 and his wife Ann 39, and Joseph 12 - an ag. labourer were all born East Meon. Their other children Louisa 9, Annie 7, Julia 4, William and Edward both aged 2 were born in North Mundham.
  • Annie Laura Primmer appeared on the census of 3 April 1881 in Surrey. She was a 18 year old domestic servant, born North Mundham, Sussex.
  • Her marriage, at 20 years and 3 months, to Alfred Henry Boyes was registered in the March 1884 Quarter in Reigate, Surry Registration District.

Benjamin Primmer

M, b. 1770, d. May 1833
  • Benjamin Primmer was born in 1770.
  • He was the son of William Primmer and Elizabeth Barton.
  • At the age of 25 years, Benjamin Primmer married Martha Newland, daughter of Richard Newland and Rebecca Chase, on 4 May 1795 in East Meon, Hampshire, England. Witnesses to the marriage were Henry Smith and William Vinn. Benjamin was a labouer and Martha a spinster. Both lived at East Meon.
  • Benjamin Primmer died in May 1833 in East Meon, Hampshire.
  • He was buried on 8 May 1833 in East Meon.

Children of Benjamin Primmer and Martha Newland

Benjamin Primmer

M, b. 13 January 1805, d. August 1825
  • Benjamin Primmer was christened on 13 January 1805 in East Meon, Hampshire, England.
  • He was baptized on 13 January 1805 in East Meon, Hampshire, England.
  • He was the son of Benjamin Primmer and Martha Newland.
  • Benjamin Primmer died in August 1825 in East Meon at age 20. The entry on the burial register has an x next to it, perhaps indicating smallpox.
  • He was buried on 4 August 1825 in East Meon.

Benjamin Primmer

M, b. 20 December 1840, d. 25 June 1918
  • Benjamin Primmer was born on 20 December 1840 in East Meon, Hampshire, New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Joseph Primmer and Ann Hurst.
  • Benjamin Primmer was baptized on 30 January 1841 in East Meon.
  • He immigrated on 15 March 1842 to New Zealand with Joseph Primmer and Ann Hurst. Joseph 30, an agricultural labourer and Ann 24 travelled on the Bolton with their children Benjamin, aged 9 months and Ann 2. Ann died on the voyage.
  • At the age of 24 years, 5 months and 11 days, Benjamin Primmer married Sarah Tasker, daughter of Thomas Tasker and Elizabeth Nussey, on 31 May 1865 in Richmond, New Zealand. They were married in Sarah's father's house. Sarah had immigrated to New Zealand with her father and brothers in 1859 ?. Benjamin was a carrier.
  • On 23 December 1875 The Nelson Evening Mail reported:- " An accident of a serious nature occurred yesterday at Hope to Mr Benjamin Primmer, who was dressing a very heavy beast for Christmas beef, when in the act of raising it somewhat high from the floor the tackle gave way and the carcass fell on Mr Primmer's leg, fracturing it in two places, below the knee and above the ankle joint. Mr Waring was shortly in attendance and set and dressed the leg. The patient is progressing as favorably as can be expected."
  • In April 1880 Thomas Holdaway appeared in court after he had been stabbed by a pitchfork. Benjamin Primmer was a witness. The Nelson Evening Mail reported :- "ASSAULTING WITH A PITCHFORK. William Henry Klein, having been remanded from Brightwater yesterday, was brought up, charged with having on the 2nd April unlawfully wounded Thomas Holdaway, at Hope. The defendant was engaged in the Franco-Prussian war in Nov. 1870, and he there received a bad sabre cut down the centre of his forehead, the scar from which is a considerable disfigurement. Mr Bunny appeared for the defendant, Inspector Acheson prosecuting. The first witness called was Thomas Holdaway, who, being sworn, said I reside at Richmond, and am the proprietor of a threshing machine. I know the defendant, who is a farm labourer. On Friday last I was working at Mr Jessops' at Hope, and the accused was also, working there. Just as we were finishing work about a quarter past five, I was standing on the engine, and defendant was about ten yards away. He beckoned to me, and I went towards him. He said, "You don't know what harm you are doing... by letting boys get on the engine." He had fork in his hand, and when I was speaking to him I put my left hand on the top of it, and he said, "Leave it alone; it's mine?”. I said, “Hold hard a minute," and was going to speak to him. He picked up the fork and stabbed at me without saying another word that I could understand, for he was talking in German. One prong struck me on the hand, and the other went through my linen jumper by my side and under my right arm. It was a violent thrust that he made. I saw it coming, and sprung back. He made a second attempt, but I was out of his reach. When he could not reach me he turned round and made a thrust at a young man named James Jary. We, all left him then. He appeared very excited. Nothing had been done to him all day so far as I am aware. If I had not jumped back I don't think I should have been here to give evidence to-day. I have only known the prisoner about a fortnight. He had had some drink, but till within five minutes of the time referred to he appeared to be as sober as anyone on the ground. I don't drink. Cross-examined by Mr Bunny- There was beer on the ground, and most of the men drank some. Mr Jessop employed them. I heard no chaff. The accused was a stranger to most of the men. When he called me the prongs of the fork were in the ground. There had been no dispute. He spoke to me in quite a friendly manner. I put my hand on his fork unthinkingly. Had he meant to stab me in the body it was possible he might not have stabbed me for I sprang back. I went back partly sideways, and the fork passed by my hand wounding my arm. I will not swear that there was not a wound there before. Supposing I had not moved I believe the fork would have gone right through me. He did not follow me up. I did not in the least expect him to stab at me. I had no idea of his intention till I saw the fork coming. By the Bench- After the accused had thrust at me he could have followed me up had he liked, but he made no attempt to do so, and turned away from me altogether and went to another young man. There was no provocation for his assault. I had given him no reason for his action. None of the men showed any signs of having drank freely. He had no appearance of being excited through drink. Benjamin Primmer deposed- On the day in question the prisoner and I were both working for Mr Jessop. Shortly after 5 o'clock I saw accused beckon Holdaway towards him. Holdaway went towards him, and I saw him standing, and they were talking about the engine. The accused had a fork in his hand, when he up with the fork and stabbed Holdaway. The fork went with violence, and Holdaway left band went between the prongs of the fork and kept it from his body. I went to see if Holdaway was hurt, and there was a mark on the forefinger of the right hand. I only saw accused make one stab at Holdaway. I saw where the fork went into Holdaway's jumper. After stabbing Holdaway the accused stabbed at Jary. The fork was taken away from him by force by two men before he stabbed at Jary. The first man that was stabbed was Coleman, and two men rushed forward and took the fork from him, but whilst we were talking he got the fork again, and it was not taken from him after. When he had stabbed at Jary he left the field and went towards home. Cross-examined by Mr Bunny -There had not been much drinking going on all were sober. We had "some tea and some beer. We had some beer from two breweries, but that was not because one could not supply enough. A good deal had occurred before Mr Holdaway was touched; it was before that the folk was taken away from him. There had been no chaffing going on, but it appeared that Coleman blew the whistle of the engine in answer to the railway train engine, and this seemed to annoy accused. By the Bench- I am sure there was nothing in the way of chaffing. The whistle was blown to answer the train it appeared afterwards that this annoyed him. Inspector Acheson said he had further evidence, but he scarcely 'thought' it necessary to call the witnesses. Their Worships concurred, and Mr Bunny then said that he should like their Worships to say whether they thought of dealing with the case summarily, because, if not, he should not then address the Court, The Chairman said they intended to deal with the case, whereupon Mr Bunny said that the prisoner, who was a Russian, served in the war in 1869 and 1870, and whilst fighting for his country received a bad sabre wound, which necessitated his being kept in a Lunatic Asylum in Germany for some time, and even now apparently any excitement affected him greatly. He said it was evident that he called Holdaway in a friendly manner, but it seemed to him that something had been kept back by the witnesses for the prosecution, and, indeed, he considered that their case had entirely broken down. The informant had received a mere scratch, but he did not think it was at all certain as to how he it, and he commented upon the prosecution omitting to produce either the pitchfork or the jumper. He urged that there must have been great aggravation, and he hoped their Worships would find that there had been, but if they thought an assault bad been committed he asked them to inflict merely a nominal penalty. Their Worships said a very severe assault had been, committed by the defendant with very little reason, and they thought there must really be something wrong about the accused, who, after calling the informant in an apparently friendly manner, stabbed at him. The effect of this stabbing might have been very dangerous, but luckily for the defendant the injury inflicted was only trivial. They should not put the country to the expense of committing deferent to the Supreme or District Courts, for they thought that by dealing with the case summarily justice would be done, and they accordingly fined the defendant £10 and costs, and in default sentenced him to two months imprisonment, with hard labour. Mr Trautvetter having been engaged as interpreter, the Court ordered that his fee be paid."
  • Benjamin Primmer was living at North Street, Palmerston North when his wife Sarah Tasker died on 19 January 1916 . "The death occurred at her residence, North st., Palmerston North, on Wednesday last, of Mrs B. Primmer, wife of Mr B. Primmer, formerly of Hope. She had reached the advanced age of 72 years and had been in bad health for a long time. She leaves a husband and and grown-up family. The family include Messrs George and Charles Primmer, Mesdames Flynn, Avery, Davidson, Dicks, and Marshall, and Miss May Primmer. It is of interest to note that Mr Primmer's mother is still living, having reached the great age of 98. She resides in Nelson, and except that her eyesight has failed, she is enjoying good health."
  • Benjamin Primmer died on 25 June 1918 in Palmerston North, New Zealand, at age 77.
  • He was buried on 26 June 1918 in Terrace End Cemetery, Palmerston North.

Children of Benjamin Primmer and Sarah Tasker

Benjamin Charles Primmer

M, b. 19 April 1846, d. September 1929
  • Benjamin Charles Primmer was baptized on 19 April 1846 in East Meon, Hampshire. Henry was a labourer of East Meon at the time.
  • He was the son of Edmund (Edward) Primmer and Harriet Sutton.
  • Her marriage, at 21 years and 4 months, to Harriett Briar was registered in the September 1867 Quarter in the Bassingstoke, Hampshire Registration District.
  • His death was recorded with the an unknown place , an unknown place Registration District in the September 1929 Quarter.

Benjamin Henry Primmer

M, b. 7 October 1853
  • Benjamin Henry Primmer was baptized on 7 October 1853 in East Meon, Hampshire. His father was a labourer living at Riplington at the time.
  • He was the son of John Primmer and Ann Norman.
  • At the time of the 7 April 1861 census Benjamin Henry Primmer was living in the household of John Primmer and Ann Norman in North Mundham, Sussex. John was the 40 year old head, born East Meon. Ann was 29 years old, born East Meon. Their children Benjamin 7, Alice Emily 5 and Joseph John 2, were all born East Meon.
  • Benjamin Henry Primmer appeared on the census of 2 April 1871 in Sussex. Benjamin was a 17 year old labourer, born Wickham?

Beryl Rachel Primmer

F, b. 10 January 1877, d. 1923
  • Beryl Rachel Primmer was born on 10 January 1877 in Otepopo, New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of John William Primmer and Mary Patchling.
  • At the age of 22 years and 3 months, Beryl Rachel Primmer married Robert Henry Hewson on 10 April 1899 in New Zealand.
  • Beryl Rachel Primmer died in 1923 in New Zealand.

Caroline Rose Primmer

F, b. 15 August 1906

Catherine (Kate) Primmer

F, b. 4 July 1869, d. 9 April 1903
  • Catherine (Kate) Primmer was born on 4 July 1869 in Okarito, New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Benjamin Primmer and Sarah Tasker.
  • At the age of 27 years, 4 months and 10 days, Catherine (Kate) Primmer married John Dick on 14 November 1896 in Napier, New Zealand.
  • Catherine (Kate) Primmer died on 9 April 1903 in Reefton, New Zealand, at age 33.

Children of Catherine (Kate) Primmer and John Dick

Charles Primmer

M, b. 16 April 1867, d. 4 March 1949
  • Charles Primmer was born on 16 April 1867 in Hokitika, Nelson, New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Benjamin Primmer and Sarah Tasker.
  • At the age of 23 years, 6 months and 27 days, Charles Primmer married Mary Ann Vaunt Flower on 12 November 1890 in Nelson, New Zealand.
  • On 15 December 1930,his wife, Mary Ann Vaunt Flower died in Motueka, Nelson, New Zealand.
  • At the age of 63 years, Charles Primmer married Annie Eliza Cairns in 1931 in New Zealand.
  • Charles Primmer died on 4 March 1949 in Motueka, New Zealand, at age 81. [His death record shows he was 83]

Child of Charles Primmer and Mary Ann Vaunt Flower

Clarence Joseph Patchling Primmer

M, b. 9 July 1884, d. 24 March 1962
  • Clarence Joseph Patchling Primmer was born on 9 July 1884 in Ashburton, New Zealand.
  • He was the son of George Conrad (Con) Primmer and Emma Jane Patchling.
  • Clarence Joseph Patchling Primmer died on 24 March 1962 in Dunedin, New Zealand, at age 77.

Claude Francis Primmer

M, b. 22 March 1882, d. 13 November 1978
  • Claude Francis Primmer was born on 22 March 1882 in Christchurch, New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Francis Primmer and Rebecca Saywell.
  • At the age of 34 years and 28 days, Claude Francis Primmer married Elizabeth Aitken Torrence on 19 April 1916 in New Zealand.
  • On 2 December 1945,his wife, Elizabeth Aitken Torrence died in Auckland, New Zealand.
  • At the age of 68 years, Claude Francis Primmer married May Constance Dawson in 1951. May was formerly Davidson.
  • On 16 March 1969,his wife, May Constance Dawson died in Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Claude Francis Primmer died on 13 November 1978 in Davenport, Auckland, New Zealand, at age 96.

Daniel Primmer

M, b. 17 April 1814
  • Daniel Primmer was baptized on 17 April 1814 in East Meon, Hampshire, England. His father was a labourer at the time.
  • He was the son of Benjamin Primmer and Martha Newland.
  • In 1831 Daniel and Edward enlisted in the 11th Foot Devonshire Regiment. Daniel's name is listed amongst those who were sent to Australia for garrison duty.
  • In 1853 Daniel was discharged from the Army. He received a Chelsea Pension.

Daphne Primmer

F, b. 29 February 1920, d. 8 April 2010
  • Daphne Primmer was born on 29 February 1920 in Christchurch, New Zealand. She was a twin to Allan.
  • She was the daughter of Edgar Clarence Primmer and Lily Smith.
  • Daphne Primmer died on 8 April 2010 in New Zealand at age 90.

Edgar Clarence Primmer

M, b. 9 June 1889, d. April 1969
  • Edgar Clarence Primmer was born on 9 June 1889 in Christchurch, New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Francis Primmer and Rebecca Saywell.
  • At the age of 27 years, 4 months and 8 days, Edgar Clarence Primmer married Lily Smith on 17 October 1916 in New Zealand.
  • Edgar Clarence Primmer died in April 1969 in Christchurch, New Zealand, at age 79.

Children of Edgar Clarence Primmer and Lily Smith

Edmund Primmer

M, b. 1902, d. 1980
  • Edmund Primmer was born in 1902.
  • He was the son of Edmund Primmer and Alice Unknown.
  • Edmund Primmer died in 1980 in Queensland.
  • He was buried on 23 September 1980 in Hemmant Cemetery.

Edmund Primmer

M, b. circa 1870
  • Edmund Primmer was born circa 1870.
  • Edmund Primmer married Alice Unknown circa 1900.

Child of Edmund Primmer and Alice Unknown

Edmund (Edward) Primmer

M, b. 14 January 1810, d. December 1879
  • Edmund (Edward) Primmer was baptized on 14 January 1810 in East Meon, Hampshire, England.
  • He was the son of Benjamin Primmer and Martha Newland.
  • Edward was a member of the 11th Foot Devonshire Regiment.
  • In 1831 Daniel and Edward enlisted in the 11th Foot Devonshire Regiment. Daniel's name is listed amongst those who were sent to Australia for garrison duty.
  • In 1842 Edward was discharged from the Army. He received a Chelsea Pension.
  • At the age of 35 years, 2 months and 29 days, Edmund (Edward) Primmer married Harriet Sutton on 12 April 1845 in East Meon, Hampshire. Edward was a bachelor, a labourer of Riplington, son of Benjamin Primmer, deceased. Harriet was a spinster of Drayton daughter of Thomas Sutton, a labourer. Witnesses were Samuel Gregory, Sarah Earwacker and Robert Smith (possibly the curate.)
  • Edmund (Edward) Primmer appeared on the census of 30 March 1851 in Hampshire. He was a farm carter Chelsea Pensioner aged 40, born East Meon.
  • He appeared on the census of 7 April 1861 in Popham, Hampshire. Edward was 51 years old, head of the household - a Chelsea Pensioner.
  • He appeared on the census of 2 April 1871 in Popham, Hampshire. Edward was 61 years old, head of the household - Bailiff, Chelsea Pensioner.
  • In March 1872, his wife, Harriet Sutton's death was registered in the Poplar, London, England Registration District. She was at age 56 years.
  • His death was recorded with the an unknown place , an unknown place Registration District in the December 1879 Quarter.

Child of Edmund (Edward) Primmer and Harriet Sutton

Edna Doris Primmer

F, b. 9 October 1911, d. 1997

Edward Primmer

M, b. 1859, d. 11 November 1936
  • Edward Primmer was born in 1859 in Nelson, New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Joseph Primmer and Ann Hurst.
  • Edward Primmer immigrated to Queensland around 1881.
  • At the age of 29 years, Edward Primmer married Amy Amelia Warmsley in 1888 in Queensland.
  • In June 1910 Edward Primmer visited his family in New Zealand. The Bruce Herald reported - "Mr N Primmer [believe this should be E not N], from Queensland, recently paid a visit to his brother, Mr G. C. Primmer, at Lakeside. Mr Primmer is a butcher with a good business in Brisbane, and has not been in New Zealand for 29 years, and naturally sees a great difference in the country. Mr Primmer intends paying a visit to his mother who living in Nelson before returning home."
  • On 23 May 1913 the Sydney Morning Herald reported "DISEASED MEAT. BRISBANE, Thursday. In the South Brisbane Summons Court this morning Edward Primmer was charged with mixing diseased meat with good meat at his shop in Logan-road. Defendant entered a plea of guilty, and mentioned that the meat was hung up in the shop waiting for the Inspector. The magistrate Imposed a fine of £20, In default two months' Imprisonment."
  • Edward Primmer died on 11 November 1936 in Brisbane, Queensland.
  • On 14 November 1936 His obituary appeared in The Courier Mail :- " Mr. E. Primmer.— Mr. Edward Primmer, who died in Brisbane on November 11 at the age of 77 years, had lived at Annerley for the last 40 years. He retired from business as a master butcher in 1919. He was formerly interested in the Savoy Picture Theatre, Clayfield, and at the time of his death was chairman of directors of the Astor Theatre, New Farm. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Annerley Bowling Club. He is survived by his widow, formerly Miss Amy Amelia Walmsley, and one daughter, Miss Mabel Primmer, of Juliette Street, Thompson Estate". His estate was later reported as "Probate Was granted in the Supreme Court on Saturday in the will of Edward Primmer late of Juliette street Thompson Estate, South Brisbane, retired butcher who died on November 11, 1936. He left a realty amounting to £9136 and personalty of £12,265, which he bequeathed to his relatives."

Child of Edward Primmer and Amy Amelia Warmsley