Eliza Cubis

F, b. 12 January 1834, d. before 1854
  • Eliza Cubis was baptized on 12 January 1834 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge, England.
  • She was the daughter of George Cubis and Thirza Peters.
  • At the time of the 7 June 1841 census Eliza Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis and Thirza Peters in High Street, Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 35 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thursy, 30 and children Elizabeth 13, Eliza 7, George 4 and Louisa 2. All were born in the county.
  • At the time of the 30 March 1851 census Eliza Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis in Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 46 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thirza40, and children Elizabeth 23, Eliza 17, George 14 an errand boy, Louisa 12, Edmund 8, Peter 4 and Martha aged 1. All were born in Brassingbourne.
  • Eliza Cubis died before 1854.

Elizabeth Cubis

F, b. 4 May 1828, d. 1890
  • Elizabeth Cubis was also known as Betsy.
  • She was baptized on 4 May 1828 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge, England.
  • She was the daughter of George Cubis and Thirza Peters.
  • At the time of the 7 June 1841 census Elizabeth Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis and Thirza Peters in High Street, Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 35 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thursy, 30 and children Elizabeth 13, Eliza 7, George 4 and Louisa 2. All were born in the county.
  • At the time of the 30 March 1851 census Elizabeth Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis in Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 46 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thirza40, and children Elizabeth 23, Eliza 17, George 14 an errand boy, Louisa 12, Edmund 8, Peter 4 and Martha aged 1. All were born in Brassingbourne.
  • Elizabeth Cubis immigrated in 1852 to Moreton Bay, Queensland, with George Cubis and Thirza Peters. George and Thirza came on the "Meridian" with their six children. George was 46 and Thirza 42, Elizabeth 24, George 16, Louisa 14, Edmond 10, Peter 5 and Martha 3. Timothy Cubis aged 25 (George's young brother), also accompanied them. The family stayed in Queensland for some time. Elizabeth married William Bailey there in 1854 in Ipswich before the family moved south. Timothy married in Queensland and came south many years later.
  • At the age of 25 years, 9 months and 23 days, Elizabeth Cubis married William Bailey on 27 February 1854 in Church of England, Ipswich, Queensland. Shortly after their marriage William and Elizabeth moved to Tenterfield with her parents George Cubis and Thirza Peters and her siblings. Witnesses to the marriage were John Laidler and Louisa Cubis.
  • Elizabeth Cubis's and William Bailey's second child Ann Elizabeth (later known as Elizabeth Ann) was born on 13 September 1856. Her father registered the birth. He was a labourer of Tenterfield at the time.
  • In 1857 Elizabeth Cubis and William Bailey lived at corner of Molesworth & Scott Streets, Tenterfield, New South Wales. William and Elizabeth's daughter in law (Rose Werner)'s obituary, written in 1952, gives details of where the Bailey families lived.
    "Miss Rose Werner married William Bailey, son of pioneer William Bailey. Other children of William Bailey sen and his wife – previously Miss Cubis – were George who died recently at Kyogle at a great age; Herbert; Arthur usually called “Peter”; Thurza (Mrs Collins); and Elizabeth (Mrs French). The Bailey home, long since demolished was not far from the corner of Molesworth and Scott Streets, and was situated between the two other old homes in the vicinity, Plowman’s and the corner house which were recently demolished.
    The home in Scott Street (Plowman’s) was the home of Arthur Bailey (Mr. Arthur T Bailey’s father), while the corner house was the home of William Bailey who married Rose Werner. It was there that their only child Fred was born.
    The Bailey property extended from Scott Street to Tenterfield Creek and included what are now the two bowling greens and crocket lawn and old freezing works. They also owned the property across Molesworth Street, on which is the old brick house, now occupied by Walter Marshall.
    The portion on which the first bowling green is constructed was disposed of for the erection of a butter factory. This was in operation there for many years, until eventually, it was burnt down, and the present factory erected at the intersection of Rouse and Cowner Streets.
    It may surprise some to the bowlers to know that the old factory well is still under the bowling green. If the covering may some day give way, some unfortunate bowler may suddenly disappear into the depths.
    At a later period, Mr. and Mrs William Bailey, and their son Fred lived in the stone house in Douglas Street (now Boston’s) and other parts of town.
    Mr. Bailey was an expert shearer in the time of blade shearing, and was at time a competitor in the shearing contests put on by the Show Society."
  • On 4 April 1865 the "Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser" reported that the following case had been tried at the TENTERFIELD QUARTER SESSIONS on 14 March 1865. The article read:-
    "LARCENY - William Bailey was placed in the dock on a similar charge, having helped himself to a tarpaulin the property of Mr.R. W. Gill, and being found guilty, was sent to Darlinghurst gaol for twelve months' imprisonment with hard labour, one day in each week solitary confinement.
    This terminated the business of the Criminal Court
    The above, prisoners were forwarded to their destination by last steamer"
    [NOTE - This may be another William Bailey but would explain why when Arthur Peter Bailey was born on 30 July 1865, his birth was registered before he was named].
    He was admitted to the Darlinghurst Gaol on 1 March 1865, and gave the following details:- William Bailey, age 37m born Sheffield,trade shoemaker, hair brown curly, eyes blue, 5' 91/2", could read/write, religion prost.., arrived in 1849 on 'Mount Stewart Elphinstone'..(a convict ship, but his name does not appear on the passenger list. )
  • On 24 July 1866 The Examiner reported that a William Baily had been arrested for his involvement in a bank robbery. The article read "SUPPOSED BANK ROBBERS
    Adam Burgess, Christopher Obertheur, and William Bailey,were brought before the Court charged with being implicated in tho late sticking up of the bank, Mr. and Mrs. Humphrey believed that tho prisoners were some of the party from the tone of their voice- but would not swear to them positively. A double-barrel gun found in the back parlour of the bank, was produced in court, but up to tho present has not been identified. The whole of the prisoners stand remanded until Wednesday, the26th instant
    "

    A later report read"REPORT OF PRISONERS. - Sub-Inspector Meares, senior Constable Scott, and troopers Ryan and Fitzgerald left Tenterfield, on Tuesday morning in order to escort the prisoners Obertheur, Bailey, Burgess, Morseman, Eggart, and the two Petries, charged with slicking up the,Bank; also the boy Wright sentenced to four months at the Quarter Sessions; ; and Patrick Hearns sentenced to five years in Darlinghurst gaol. Hearns was so violent in his conduct, that it was found necessary to place leg irons on him.

    The men were tried in the Armidale Circuit Court on 8 October 1866. The trial was reported in "The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser" on 16 October 1866. "Dietrich Moseman, William Pietrie, Jacob Pietrie, William Bailey, and John Eggart were charged with having, at Tenterfield, on the 11th July, stolen from the dwelling house of Richard Tomlinson Martin, three pistols, of the value of £20, being the property of the Australian Joint Stock Bank, and putting the inmates of the house in bodily fear. The prisoners pleaded not guilty, and were defended by Mr. Wisdom ; attorney, Mr. Abbott. The evidence showed that on the day named, six persons, armed, stuck up the bank at Tenterfield. They placed the manager, accountant, and other persons in the bank in a dark room. There was a hole in the wall of this room, and the manager and the accountant escaped through this, and gave an alarm, which disturbed the thieves, and they bolted, carrying away three pistols, which for security they had seized when entering the build building; but they got no money, it being locked up in an iron safe that they had no time to open. A married woman, named Obertheur, swore that the robbery had been planned at her house, her husband taking part in it. The prisoners, with the exception of Moseman, who was acquitted,were found guilty. Christopher Obertheur, tried separately, was also found guilty, and they were all sentenced as follows :-Christopher Obertheur and William Bailey each to ten years hard labour on the roads ; William Pietrie to five years, Jacob Pietrie and John Eggart each to three years hard labour on the roads.

    Dietrich Moseman was charged with shooting, with intent to murder, George Humphries, at Tenterfield, on the 11th July last. This case was remanded until the next Assizes, the Crown Prosecutor not being prepared to go on with it "

    On Wednesday 24 October, the "Empire" newspaper published Obertheur's testimony "ROBBERY OF THE BANK, TENTERFIELD.

    The following is the statement of the prisoner Obertheur, one of the robbers that stuck-up the bank at Tenterfield on the 11th July last, and read at the prisoner's trial, before Judge Faucett, at the Armidale Assizes, on the 9th instant :

    I hereby make the following statement about the bank robbery in Tenterfield on Wednesday, July the 11th. About the 27th of March last, William Bayley came from Darlinghurst home, and came to me and wanted me to go and help to stick-up the bank at Tenterfield. I told him that I was in trouble enough without getting in any further. He did not come for about five or six weeks when he came again, and told me that he only wanted me to help him, and that I would get at the least about a thousand pounds in cash. I then asked him how it could be done ; he told me that he could open the safe and then burn all the books, but not to kill anyone in the bank ; but if one of us should be taken, to rescue him and shoot the police, or any one that should take any one. So Bayley came every night, and stopped till 11, 12, and sometimes 1 o'clock in the night. He also told me that if any one would be taken and put in the lock up, that he would get witnesses to come and swear us out, and if it could not be done, to take them out of the lock-up, and if that could not be done, to take him off the police on the road. Some time in May last, W. Bayley came in the day time, and one day Dietrich Moseman came to see me and Bayley was there. Mose- man told me that some one had stuck-up the Armidale mail. I told him, or Bayley told him, if he would like to do something. Moseman said, " What is the best thing we can do? but there is no money anywhere;" and when Bayley said, "There is plenty in the white house over the creek.'' D. Moseman said. " If John Eggart would go he would go,"' and I went to John Eggart along with D. Moseman and John Eggart did not like to go, and D. Moseman would not go ; but Bayley went to Moseman and Eggart and made it all right, and one day D. Moseman came and brought William Petrie, and told me that if we would take him that he would make a good one, and Bayley agreed. Bayley then told me to try and get some other one to make the six men-it would be better. I did not know any one. D. Mose- man told me to go to William Drenart. I went, and he would not come ; but he said a man by the name of Kenor would come, and I told Bayley about him. Bayley told me to see him. I went to the man, and he said he would come, and he came several times to me and helped to drink some rum, but finding that he was a drunkard the company would not have him; but Bayley told W. Petrie to try his brother, but the brother would not come, and never came until the night the sticking-up was done. The plan was made, and all were led away by W. Bayley. Nobody would ever have anything like that in their mind before he proposed it. It was to be done on the 11th of July, and the follow- ingg all met at W. Bayley's. Present:-W. Bayley, William Petrie, Jacob Petrie, Deitrich Moseman, John Eggart, and myself, Christopher Obertheur. Bayley sent John Eggart for one bottle of rum. Eggart went and brought one bottle from Mrs. Sullivan's, about 7 o'clock that night, and we all drunk some and took the bottle to the bank. I had one pistol with flint lock and stock broken-not loaded ; Bayley bad one double-barrelled gun-loaded very much ; John Eggart had one pistol-loaded with powder; Jacob Petrie one pistol-not loaded ; D. Moseman one pistol-loaded ; William Petrie one single-barrelled gun-loaded.

    When we got to the bank, Bayley did not like to be No. one for the attack, so it was agreed for me to be the captain. I went in the house first, then came Bayley, Eggart, and Jacob Petrie ; William Petrie and Moseman went to the kitchen.
    When I went in Mr. Nathan got trembly and was very frightened. I told him that I would not hurt him, and told him to sit down. Bayley pointed the gun at him, and then leaving Eggart and Petrie there and myself, Bayley looked for a room to put them into. He came back, and told us to put them into the room off the pantry. Bayley had a candle in his hand. Before we put them in the room I felt Mr. Martin and Mr.Nathan for firearms, and then told them to go in the room. After this time Bayley brought in the man and wife out of the kitchen to the parlour. I told the woman to go into the room. The woman would not go, but called us all sorts of names. Her husband said to her to come, and not to mind, and did not care if we took the bank. She went with him in the room. Bayley told the men that " if they moved, to blow their brains out." Bayley and myself went into the office and got the revolvers-three-and then had a look in the other rooms. After that, Bayley said, " Let us go for the key," giving me two revolvers and himself one. We went back to the room and told them that the two head men were to come out. Humphrey and wife came. I told them the other two men.

    Humphrey said that there was only themselves, and they were saying not to shoot them. I told them that we would not do anything to them. They were frightened. Humphrey went into the room, and turned round his back. The woman was standing outside in the other room. During this time I had my hand on one of the revolvers, and gave the other one to Bayley. The one that I had ¡n my hand I cannot tell, but it went off. I never had a revolver in my hand before. I always thought that, if a person would fire a shot, that he would have to put the hammer up first. Bayley gave one revolver to John Eggart. After finding that Mr. Martin and Nathan had escaped, then all left. If I have forgotten anything, I shall be glad to let you know. Mr. Martin and Nathan have stated the truth, but Humphrey did not care much, but he may have done it in a fright. Mr. Humphrey did not tell the truth, but very little. I hope that you will not allow that woman to swear in any other case, for she would say anything, and some man may be hung for it. The dress we six men had on it was impossible to identify our faces not even being blackened, but crape of different kind was over our faces. When the men left the bank, the others were all frightened, and Bayley left our double barrelled gun in the parlour. One of the other men left the bottle with some rum in it in the street. When we got over the fence Moseman, Bayley, and Petrie left first; John Eggart, Jacob Petrie, and myself left after, and went to my residence. The other party left for the house. When I went in my house I saw Adam Burgess on the sofa, drunk. During this time I heard great firing at the bank. Afterwards I went to John Eggart, and Eggart told me that he would put the revolver in a log on the road to John Cook. About half-past 8 o'clock I went home and sat by the fire. Adam Bur gess, after having a sleep, spoke to me, and I went to bed. Adam Burgess, committed for that, is innocent, and knows nothing whatever about the affair; and no man spoke like Burgess, nor had any clothes on of that kind at the bank. I threw my powder away below Mr. Rogers"s house in the creek, and I hope you will find it. Eggart told me that after Bayley got in the lock-up that Mrs. Bayley brought the revolver to Mrs. Obertheur and I hope you will get it.

    (Signed) CHRISTOPHER OBERTHEUR.

    His admission details to Darlinghurst Gaol are as follows:- ) Admission Nov 1866, William Baily, age 39, born England, no trade shown, hair brown, eyes grey, 5'8 3/4", complexion fresh, could read/write, religion prost., arrived in 1852 on 'Meridian'...(This was the ship his wife Elizabeth Cubis arrived on), Remarks..'has served a sentence in Darlinghurst'.

  • In 1872 Elizabeth appeared in the Grenville Post Office directory of Tenterfield. She was listed as a resident. William's name didn't appear.
  • Elizabeth Cubis died in 1890 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.

Children of Elizabeth Cubis and William Bailey

Elizabeth Cubis

F, b. 1885, d. 1887
  • Elizabeth Cubis was born in 1885 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.
  • She was the daughter of Peter Cubis and Jane Agnes Henderson.
  • Elizabeth Cubis died in 1887 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.

Elizabeth Agnes Cubis

F, b. 1875

Emma Cubis

F, b. 1870

Eric James Cubis

M, b. 1914, d. 17 December 1994
  • Eric James Cubis was born in 1914 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.
  • He was the son of James Edward (Jim) Cubis and Eliza (Didi) Bezanson.
  • At the age of 24 years, Eric James Cubis married Evelyn Annie Hinitt in 1938 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.
  • Eric James Cubis died on 17 December 1994 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.

Ester Annie Cubis

F, b. 1886

Eveline Cubis

F, b. 1903
  • Eveline Cubis was born in 1903 in Inverell, New South Wales.
  • She was the daughter of Frances Ann Cubis.

Frances Ann Cubis

F, b. 1860
  • Frances Ann Cubis was born in 1860 in Queensland.
  • She was the daughter of Timothy Cubis and Harriet Ann Clements.
  • At the age of 16 years, Frances Ann Cubis married William Francis Adams in 1876 in Vegetable Creek, New South Wales. Frances had at least 7 children but all were registered under the name of CUBIS, not ADAMS with no father's name listed.

Children of Frances Ann Cubis

George Cubis

M, b. 28 July 1805, d. 29 May 1859
  • George Cubis was baptized on 28 July 1805 in Eton Socon, Cambridge, England.
  • He was the son of Peter Cubis and Martha Jervis.
  • At the age of 22 years, 3 months and 28 days, George Cubis married Thirza Peters, daughter of Robert Peters and Elizabeth Fuller Wesnutt, on 25 November 1827 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge, England.
  • George Cubis and Thirza Peters appeared on the census of 7 June 1841 in High Street, Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 35 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thursy, 30 and children Elizabeth 13, Eliza 7, George 4 and Louisa 2. All were born in the county.
  • George Cubis appeared on the census of 30 March 1851 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 46 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thirza40, and children Elizabeth 23, Eliza 17, George 14 an errand boy, Louisa 12, Edmund 8, Peter 4 and Martha aged 1. All were born in Brassingbourne.
  • He and Thirza Peters immigrated to Moreton Bay, Queensland, in 1852. George and Thirza came on the "Meridian" with their six children. George was 46 and Thirza 42, Elizabeth 24, George 16, Louisa 14, Edmond 10, Peter 5 and Martha 3. Timothy Cubis aged 25 (George's young brother), also accompanied them. The family stayed in Queensland for some time. Elizabeth married William Bailey there in 1854 in Ipswich before the family moved south. Timothy married in Queensland and came south many years later.
  • George Cubis died on 29 May 1859 in Tenterfield, New South Wales, at age 53.
  • He was buried on 31 May 1859 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.

Children of George Cubis and Thirza Peters

George Cubis

M, b. 3 April 1831, d. before 1836
  • George Cubis was baptized on 3 April 1831 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge, England.
  • He was the son of George Cubis and Thirza Peters.
  • George Cubis died before 1836. A second child was named George in 1836.

George Cubis

M, b. 14 August 1836
  • George Cubis was baptized on 14 August 1836 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge, England.
  • He was the son of George Cubis and Thirza Peters.
  • At the time of the 7 June 1841 census George Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis and Thirza Peters in High Street, Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 35 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thursy, 30 and children Elizabeth 13, Eliza 7, George 4 and Louisa 2. All were born in the county.
  • At the time of the 30 March 1851 census George Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis in Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 46 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thirza40, and children Elizabeth 23, Eliza 17, George 14 an errand boy, Louisa 12, Edmund 8, Peter 4 and Martha aged 1. All were born in Brassingbourne.
  • George Cubis immigrated in 1852 to Moreton Bay, Queensland, with George Cubis and Thirza Peters. George and Thirza came on the "Meridian" with their six children. George was 46 and Thirza 42, Elizabeth 24, George 16, Louisa 14, Edmond 10, Peter 5 and Martha 3. Timothy Cubis aged 25 (George's young brother), also accompanied them. The family stayed in Queensland for some time. Elizabeth married William Bailey there in 1854 in Ipswich before the family moved south. Timothy married in Queensland and came south many years later.

George Edward Cubis

M, b. 1869, d. 1925

Children of George Edward Cubis and Eliza Christina Werner

George F Cubis

M, b. circa 1870, d. 1934

George Robert Cubis

M, b. 1893

Children of George Robert Cubis and Florence May Miles

Hannah Cubis

F, b. 1887

Hebert William Cubis

M, b. 1896, d. 1940
  • Hebert William Cubis was born in 1896 in Queensland.
  • He was the son of John Peter Cubis and Ester Annie Davey.
  • At the age of 29 years, Hebert William Cubis married Sarah Ann Derwin in 1925 in Queensland.
  • Hebert William Cubis died in 1940 in Queensland.

Henry G Cubis

M, b. 1891
  • Henry G Cubis was born in 1891 in Emmaville, New South Wales.
  • He was the son of Frances Ann Cubis.

James Edward (Jim) Cubis

M, b. 1883, d. 19 April 1972

James Edward Cubis and Eliza Bezanson and their grandson. Photo courtesy of Helen J.

  • James Edward (Jim) Cubis was born in 1883 in Tenterfield, New South Wales. The surname is spelt Cubiss on his birth registration.
  • He was the son of Peter Cubis and Jane Agnes Henderson.
  • At the age of 19 years, James Edward (Jim) Cubis married Eliza (Didi) Bezanson, daughter of Isaiah James Bezanson and Eliza Jane French, on 5 December 1902 in Presbyterian Church, Tenterfield, New South Wales, Australia. . They were married by Richard Dill Mckay and were attended by Mr & Mrs George Werner.
  • In 1902 James Edward (Jim) Cubis and Eliza (Didi) Bezanson lived in Tenterfield, New South Wales. They remained there for their entire lives.
  • James Edward (Jim) Cubis died on 19 April 1972 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.
  • He was buried in Methodist Section, Tenterfield Cemetery.

Children of James Edward (Jim) Cubis and Eliza (Didi) Bezanson

John Peter Cubis

M, b. 19 December 1855, d. 1946
  • John Peter Cubis was born on 19 December 1855.
  • He was the son of George Cubis and Thirza Peters.
  • At the age of 25 years, John Peter Cubis married Ester Annie Davey in 1881 in Queensland. Surname spelt CUPIS.
  • John Peter Cubis died in 1946 in Queensland.

Children of John Peter Cubis and Ester Annie Davey

Josephine R Cubis

F, b. circa 1880, d. 1884
  • Josephine R Cubis was born circa 1880.
  • She was the daughter of Timothy Cubis and Harriet Ann Clements.
  • Josephine R Cubis died in 1884 in Emmaville, New South Wales.

Lillian Cubis

F, b. 1874

Lillian Mary Cubis

F, b. 1864, d. 1868

Louis Edward Cubis

M, b. 19 February 1902
  • Louis Edward Cubis was born on 19 February 1902 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.
  • He was the son of George Edward Cubis and Eliza Christina Werner.
  • Louis Edward Cubis began military service circa 1942 in Paddington, New South Wales. He gave his next of kin as his brother Stanley. His service number was NX72093.
  • At the age of 42 years, Louis Edward Cubis married Alma Mary Paul, daughter of John T S Paul and Florence A Casey, in 1945 in Burwood, Sydney, New South Wales.

Louisa Cubis

F, b. 6 October 1839, d. 1918
  • Louisa Cubis was baptized on 6 October 1839 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge, England.
  • She was the daughter of George Cubis and Thirza Peters.
  • At the time of the 7 June 1841 census Louisa Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis and Thirza Peters in High Street, Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 35 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thursy, 30 and children Elizabeth 13, Eliza 7, George 4 and Louisa 2. All were born in the county.
  • At the time of the 30 March 1851 census Louisa Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis in Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 46 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thirza40, and children Elizabeth 23, Eliza 17, George 14 an errand boy, Louisa 12, Edmund 8, Peter 4 and Martha aged 1. All were born in Brassingbourne.
  • Louisa Cubis immigrated in 1852 to Moreton Bay, Queensland, with George Cubis and Thirza Peters. George and Thirza came on the "Meridian" with their six children. George was 46 and Thirza 42, Elizabeth 24, George 16, Louisa 14, Edmond 10, Peter 5 and Martha 3. Timothy Cubis aged 25 (George's young brother), also accompanied them. The family stayed in Queensland for some time. Elizabeth married William Bailey there in 1854 in Ipswich before the family moved south. Timothy married in Queensland and came south many years later.
  • Louisa Cubis witnessed the marriage of William Bailey and Elizabeth Cubis on 27 February 1854 in Church of England, Ipswich, Queensland; Shortly after their marriage William and Elizabeth moved to Tenterfield with her parents George Cubis and Thirza Peters and her siblings. Witnesses to the marriage were John Laidler and Louisa Cubis.
  • At the age of 19 years, Louisa Cubis married Frederick Wyman in 1859 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.
  • Louisa Cubis died in 1918 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.

Lucy Eliza Cubis

F, b. 1911, d. 1983

Ruby and Lucy Cubis. Photo courtesy of Helen Jones.

Martha Cubis

F, b. 7 August 1848
  • Martha Cubis was born on 7 August 1848 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge.
  • She was the daughter of George Cubis and Thirza Peters.
  • Martha Cubis was baptized on 5 August 1849 in Brassingbourne, Cambridge, England.
  • At the time of the 30 March 1851 census Martha Cubis was living in the household of George Cubis in Brassingbourne, Cambridge. George is shown as a 46 year old agricultural labourer living with his wife Thirza40, and children Elizabeth 23, Eliza 17, George 14 an errand boy, Louisa 12, Edmund 8, Peter 4 and Martha aged 1. All were born in Brassingbourne.
  • Martha Cubis immigrated in 1852 to Moreton Bay, Queensland, with George Cubis and Thirza Peters. George and Thirza came on the "Meridian" with their six children. George was 46 and Thirza 42, Elizabeth 24, George 16, Louisa 14, Edmond 10, Peter 5 and Martha 3. Timothy Cubis aged 25 (George's young brother), also accompanied them. The family stayed in Queensland for some time. Elizabeth married William Bailey there in 1854 in Ipswich before the family moved south. Timothy married in Queensland and came south many years later.
  • At the age of 16 years, 4 months and 27 days, Martha Cubis married James Hunter on 3 January 1865 in Tenterfield, New South Wales.

Martha Harriet Cubis

F, b. 1862, d. 1963
  • Martha Harriet Cubis was born in 1862 in Queensland.
  • She was the daughter of Timothy Cubis and Harriet Ann Clements.
  • At the age of 43 years, Martha Harriet Cubis married Hugh Joseph Kelly in 1905 in Queensland.
  • Martha Harriet Cubis died in 1963 in Queensland. Her death record was under her maiden name of Cubis.

May Cubis

F, b. 1896

Moffat James Cubis

M, b. 1906, d. 21 November 1997