Malcolm Henry Bridgeman

M, b. 1913, d. 1959
  • Malcolm Henry Bridgeman was born in 1913 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Frederick Albert Bridgeman and Jessie Mary Rossiter.
  • Malcolm Henry Bridgeman appeared on the Electoral Roll between 1946 and 1949 living at Bay of Plenty.
  • He appeared on the Electoral Roll between 1954 and 1957 living at Waikato.
  • Malcolm Henry Bridgeman died in 1959 in New Zealand.

Mary Ellen Bridgeman

F, b. 29 April 1911, d. 29 November 2000
  • Mary Ellen Bridgeman was born on 29 April 1911 in New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Frederick Albert Bridgeman and Jessie Mary Rossiter.
  • At the age of 24 years, Mary Ellen Bridgeman married Huia William Marsh Goble in 1936.
  • Mary Ellen Bridgeman appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1938 living at Stratford.
  • On 17 March 1941,her husband, Huia William Marsh Goble died in New Zealand at age 31. He was living in Dudley Road, Inglewood at the time of his death.
  • Mary Ellen Bridgeman appeared on the Electoral Roll between 1946 and 1949 living at Taranaki. She was a widow.
  • She appeared on the Electoral Roll between 1964 and 1972 living at Stratford.
  • She appeared on the Electoral Roll between 1978 and 1981 living at Taranaki.
  • Mary Ellen Bridgeman died on 29 November 2000 in New Zealand at age 89. She was living at Marinoto Rest Home at the time of her death.
  • She was buried on 4 December 2000 in Inglewood Cemetery. She was buried with her husband who died almost 60 years before.

Matilda Alice Bridgeman

F, b. 4 September 1884, d. 10 August 1976

Children of Matilda Alice Bridgeman and Andrew August Bosse

Neil Bridgeman

M, b. 1910, d. 2 September 1959
  • Neil Bridgeman was born in 1910 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of William James Bridgeman and Annie Miller Wright.
  • Neil Bridgeman died on 2 September 1959.
  • He was buried on 4 September 1959 in Okato Cemetery. He was a dairy farmer of Hempton Road, Okato.

Norman Bridgeman

M, b. 1896, d. 20 October 1956
  • Norman Bridgeman was born in 1896 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of James Adams Bridgeman and Mary Ann Rampton.
  • Norman enlisted in the 16th Reinforcements, J Company, New Zealand Expeditionary Force as a Private. He was a cheesemaker and gave his next of kin as his father J A Bridgeman of Maire Street, Inglewood, Taranaki, New Zealand. He embarked on the 20 August 1916 from New Zealand on the "Navua" bound for Devonport, England.
  • Norman Bridgeman died on 20 October 1956 in New Zealand. He was a railway servant.
  • He was buried on 23 October 1956 in Te Henui Cemetery.

Phoebe Constance Bridgeman

F, b. 25 August 1891, d. 15 August 1980

Children of Phoebe Constance Bridgeman and William Ambrose Fraser

Priscilla Ann Bridgeman

F, b. 7 February 1859, d. March 1859
  • Priscilla Ann Bridgeman was born on 7 February 1859 in Otago, New Zealand. She was a twin to Sarah and named for her aunt Priscilla Ann McAdams, Sarah's sister.
  • She was the daughter of Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah McAdam.
  • Priscilla Ann Bridgeman died in March 1859. as an infant. She was 4-6 weeks old according to researchers who exhumed the bodies in the cemetery and carried out DNA matches on the bodies.
  • She was buried in Back Road. She was the 9th burial in the cemetery, although no date of burial was given.

Rebekah Bridgeman

F, b. 1 February 1844
  • Rebekah Bridgeman was born on 1 February 1844 in Nelson, New Zealand. She was baptised on the 31st March 1844 in St John's church, Nelson by Rev John Aldred.
  • She was the daughter of Thomas Bridgeman and Jane Eyles.
  • Rebekah Bridgeman and Jane Eyles immigrated on 9 October 1845. Jane & Rebekah departed from Port Nelson on the 26 September 1845 on the Comet. By the time she arrived in Sydney on 9 October Jane was almost eight months pregnant with Charles.
    During the four months it took for Jane to arrive in Australia, Thomas would have been looking for work. When Jane arrived it seems the family was immediately on the move again. Charles Walter Bridgeman he gave his place of birth as Gosswick (Gostwyck), New England when he married. Just how did the family get to Gostwyck from Sydney in the few weeks before his birth?
    Edward Gostwyck Cory (1799-1873) was granted over 2,000 acres of land fronting the Paterson River (in the Hunter Region) by Governor Brisbane in 1823. He had called this property Gostwyck. [Note: - Ironically the horse alleged stolen by William Gillis in 1851 belonged to Edward Cory]. Edward secured a second tract of grazing land near present day Uralla and about 20 km south of Armidale, which he also called Gostwyck. He quickly sold it to his partner William Dangar who in turn sold it to his brother Henry Dangar in 1832.
    How was it that Charles was born on 11 November, 1845 at Gostwyck, New England? A Richard Towns, who arrived in Sydney in March 1845, was bound to Henry Dangar in New England. His great, great grandson wrote: - “It is said that they travelled to Morpeth by boat, a trip which took about 11 hours, and then by horse and cart or bullock to New England, with the whole trip taking "almost a month".” A similar fate would have met Thomas and Jane. It does not seem possible that Jane travelled overland for “almost a month” and gave birth to Charles at Gostwyck in New England on 11 November 1845. Charles was then baptized three weeks later while his parents were living on the Clarence River. How did they make that trip in three weeks?
    It was possible, however, that Charles may have been born at the Gostwyck on the Paterson River as the property was accessible by boat via Newcastle and a journey from there to the Clarence River would only take a few days taking the coastal route. Wherever Charles was born, it is no doubt that his father had some connection to one of the Gostwyck properties.
    The family remained in the Clarence district, with Thomas working as a fisherman/carpenter from a houseboat according to family hearsay. When their daughter Jane was baptised in January, 1848 his occupation was given as a carpenter. At that time Grafton consisted of a small collection of building on the South side of the River. Further up the river, at Copmanhurst, the head of navigation, another settlement was being established. Thomas most likely travelled between the two settlements looking for work.
    An escaped convict Richard Craig had lead authorities who were interested in the great stands of cedar trees in the area, to the site of present day Grafton. He was a skilled bushman and in the 1830’s drove a flock of sheep from Ebor (between Armidale and Dorrigo) to The Settlement as Grafton was then known. In 1840 he bought 8,000 sheep down for J. R. Grose’s run at Copmanhurst. The sheep were ferried across the river on barge. His track through the bush to Grafton became known as the Craig Line, and was later used my many travellers. Was this how Thomas and Jane moved from Gostwyck near Uralla to Grafton?
    At some stage Thomas met George Kettel. George was the son of a William Kettel Esq, from Wateringbury in Kent. In 1841 George was granted a Depasturing License for the Moonbi run on the Peel River at Liverpool Plains (now on the main Highway between Tamworth and Armidale). The lease was later taken up by Henry Dangar (owner of Gostwyck). On 1 November 1841, a Joseph Robinson was given a Ticket of Leave Passport 6 (41/485) to proceed to the Peel River under the service of Mr George Kettel on Moonbi and Tuckerman Sheep Stations near Tamworth. In 1847 George was at Peels River. He placed an advertisement in The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser advising that a horse had been lost or stolen from Peels River and that a reward of up to three pound would be paid for its return to either himself or Henry Dangar Esq. On 19 September 1848 The NSW Government Gazette advertised that Henry Dangar had claimed the lease of the Moonbi run. The run had grazing capacity for 8,000 sheep. The description of the run included a comment about “the hut occupied by Mr George Kettel”. Also in 1848, Henry Dangar’s brother John took up the Wallan run near present day Drillham on the Darling Downs. Perhaps as early as 1849, George Kettel took up the lease on Bogandilla Station on the Darling Downs. Some references state it was part of the Wallan run, then owned by John Dangar. George would have needed to move his sheep from the Moonbi run since the lease was now owned by Henry Dangar. Family hearsay has it that “when Charles was about 5 years old his family in partnership with a Sea Captain Kettle took a flock of sheep and settled on land at Dulacca near Miles”. [Charles would have been four in early 1850]. Just what role Thomas Bridgeman played in this arrangement is uncertain. Certainly Thomas’s carpentry skills would have been valuable in establishing shelter for the party when they arrived at the station. But did he have his own flock of sheep? Making arrangements for such a trip would have taken some time and most likely involved acquiring a number of drays to carry food and goods. The Bridgeman family would have travelled to New England the quickest route being via the Craig Line. Perhaps the party made their arrangements for the trip at Gostwyck near Uralla, since the station was the largest in the region and certainly larger than George Kettel’s hut on Moombi. Kettle also had a close association with Henry Dangar, the owner of Gostwyck. Could this stay have left an impression on young Charles – who later stated he was born there?
    The most logical route for George Kettle to follow to Bognadilla near present day Dulacca, would have been via the water courses to ensure a good water supply for the sheep. After leaving Moombi the flock would have travelled to Gostwyck and then north. One possible route would have been to follow the Macintyre River from around what is now Inverell into Queensland (then NSW), and then it’s tributary Macintyre Brook. Frances Gillies was born at Meme , most likely a station on Macintyre Brook around present day Inglewood on 10 August 1850. It is possible that he was born during the trip north with George Kettel, meaning Jane would have made the overland trip during the latter stages of her pregnancy. From Macintyre Brook the flock may have reached Bogandilla in the spring of 1850 via the Condamine River. At some point during the family’s travels Rebecka died. No record of her death on the Clarence, during the overland trip or at Bogandilla has been found.
  • Rebekah Bridgeman died in Australia. No official record of her death has been found. Jane's death certicate states that she had two daughters deceased from her first marriage.

Reginald James Bridgeman

M, b. 1899, d. 1916
  • Reginald James Bridgeman was born in 1899 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Thomas Henry Bridgeman and Charlotte Ann Stockman.
  • Reginald James Bridgeman died in 1916 in New Zealand.
  • He was buried in Te Henui Cemetery. He was a sawmill hand.

Richard Rowland Ewins Bridgeman

M, b. 19 October 1895, d. 1 April 1898
  • Richard Rowland Ewins Bridgeman was born on 19 October 1895 in Queensland.
  • He was the son of Charles Daniel Bridgeman and Frances Myrah Ewins.
  • Richard Rowland Ewins Bridgeman died on 1 April 1898 in Queensland at age 2.
  • He was buried in Queensland. Charles and Myrah's gravestone reads-
    in loving memory of charles bridgeman died November 12th 1910 aged 65 years erected by his loving wife and family also Myrah Frances Bridgeman died April 10 1936 aged 85 years and 11 months, also infant son Richard Roland died 1895 aged 2 years and 4 months.

Rita Maud Bridgeman

F, b. 4 February 1904, d. 18 June 1990
  • Rita Maud Bridgeman was born on 4 February 1904 in New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of Thomas Henry Bridgeman and Charlotte Ann Stockman.
  • At the age of 18 years, Rita Maud Bridgeman married Douglas Percival Hill in 1923 in New Zealand.
  • On 15 July 1957,her husband, Douglas Percival Hill died in New Zealand. He lived at 8 Darnell Street, New Plymouth and he was a storeman.
  • Rita Maud Bridgeman was buried on 22 January 1990 in Te Henui Cemetery.
  • Rita Maud Bridgeman died on 18 June 1990 in New Zealand at age 86. She lived in 18 Darnell Street, Fitzroy, New Plymouth.

Robert Edgar Bridgeman

M, b. 1897, d. 4 February 1912
  • Robert Edgar Bridgeman was born in 1897 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of Thomas Henry Bridgeman and Charlotte Ann Stockman.
  • Robert Edgar Bridgeman died on 4 February 1912 in New Zealand.
  • He was buried on 6 February 1912 in Inglewood Cemetery. He was a school boy of Inglewood.

Rosina May Bridgeman

F, b. 27 May 1879, d. 9 April 1964

Children of Rosina May Bridgeman and George Carey

Sarah Bridgeman

F, b. 7 February 1859, d. 6 June 1880
  • Sarah Bridgeman was born on 7 February 1859 in Otago, New Zealand. She was a twin to Priscilla Ann.
  • She was the daughter of Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah McAdam.
  • Sarah Bridgeman died on 6 June 1880 in New Zealand at age 21.
  • Sarah Bridgeman died on 6 June 1880 in New Zealand at age 21. She died of Tuberculosis.
  • The following article appeared in the Tarakaki Herald on 8 June 1880. "On the 6th of June at Inglewood, after a long and painful illness, Sarah, only daughter of Mr Thomas Bridgeman."
  • She was buried on 9 June 1880 in Inglewood Cemetery.

Sarah Bridgeman

F, b. 1887, d. 7 August 1950
  • Sarah Bridgeman was born in 1887 in New Zealand.
  • She was the daughter of James Adams Bridgeman and Mary Ann Rampton.
  • At the age of 20 years, Sarah Bridgeman married Joseph Aloys Meier in 1907 in New Zealand.
  • Sarah Bridgeman died on 7 August 1950 in New Zealand.
  • She was buried on 9 August 1950 in Te Henui Cemetery.

Child of Sarah Bridgeman and Joseph Aloys Meier

Sarah Elizabeth Bridgeman

F, b. 1875, d. 30 August 1962
  • Sarah Elizabeth Bridgeman was born in 1875 in Victoria.
  • She was the daughter of Alexander Alfred Bridgeman and Agnes Methven.
  • At the age of 18 years, Sarah Elizabeth Bridgeman married Benjamin Joseph Cannon in 1893 in Victoria.
  • On 23 July 1929,her husband, Benjamin Joseph Cannon died in Victoria.
  • Sarah Elizabeth Bridgeman died on 30 August 1962 in Victoria.
  • She was buried on 2 September 1962 in Colac Cemetery.

Children of Sarah Elizabeth Bridgeman and Benjamin Joseph Cannon

Stuart Alfred Bridgeman

M, b. 1930, d. 2 November 1950
  • Stuart Alfred Bridgeman was born in 1930 in Victoria.
  • He was the son of Alfred Leslie Bridgeman and Elsie Boyd.
  • Stuart Alfred Bridgeman died on 2 November 1950 in Victoria.
  • He was buried on 4 November 1950 in Colac Cemetery.

Susannah Rebinney Bridgeman

F, b. 1873, d. 1875

Sussanah Bridgeman

F, b. 1837, d. August 1860
  • Sussanah Bridgeman was born in 1837 in South Australia.
  • She was the daughter of Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah Newitt.
  • Sussanah Bridgeman was baptized in Victoria.
  • At the age of 16 years, Sussanah Bridgeman married Samuel Green in 1853 in Victoria. Samuel was 36, a widowed shoemaker, Sussanah only 16.
  • Sussanah Bridgeman was buried in August 1860 in Creswick Cemetery. C of E, Row 11, Grave 2041. She is buried with her daughter.
  • Sussanah Bridgeman died in August 1860 in Victoria. Her death certificate [reg. no. 8306] showed she was born in Adelaide.

Children of Sussanah Bridgeman and Samuel Green

Thomas Bridgeman

M, b. April 1807, d. 7 February 1893

Thomas Bridgeman & Jane Eyes and perhaps Charles and Jane c 1848

  • Thomas Bridgeman was born in April 1807 in Kent, England. (according to New Zealand Death Certificate). Some sources list his name as Thomas Walter Bridgeman. The only official documents found to date, that includes the middle name of Walter are the marriage and death certificates of his son Charles Walter Bridgeman.
  • He may have been baptised on 21 February 1808 in Wickham, Kent. son of Robert and Sarah Bridgeman.
  • At the age of 27 years and 4 months, Thomas Bridgeman married Sarah Newitt on 24 August 1834 in Surry, England. Thomas was a bachelor and Sarah a spinster, both of the Parish of St Mary Newington. They were married by banns. Witnesses to the marriage were Edmund ? and Elizabeth ?. Sarah had been baptized just a few weeks before their marriage.
  • In 1834 when they made application to come to Australia , Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah Newitt lived in Blackfriars Road.
  • Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah Newitt immigrated to Adelaide on 17 October 1837. According to the immigration records Thomas and his wife Sarah were still livng in Blackfriars at the time they made application as assisted immigrants. Thomas was 29 years old and a carpenter and Sarah was 23. There were no children listed. They came on the "Katherine Stewart Forbes". Their application number was 0945, Embarkment no 514.
  • Between November 1837 and 1840 Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah Newitt lived in George Street, Adelaide. According to South Australian directories he was a carpenter. While they lived in Adelaide their daughter Sussanah was born in 1837. She died aged 23, in Victoria.
  • Sometime before 1841 Thomas and Sarah moved to Melbourne where their son Alexander was born. He and his sister Susannah were baptized at in St James Church of England in Melbourne.
    According to family hearsay Thomas was "the ship's carpenter on Lieutenant Hobson's ship, which sailed for New Zealand. He was believed to have piloted Hobson's ship into Auckland Harbour, because he had visited Auckland previously, and knew the channel in". William Hobson was Lieutenant Governor of New Zealand. He declared English sovereignty over New Zealand in 1840. Several days later he sent his ship HMS Britomart commanded by Owen Stanley to report on the establishment of a French settlement at Akakoa. Stanley raised the English flag at Akakoa on August 10, before the French disembarked. The following year, 1841, Stanley, in the HMS Britomart , was commissioned to carry out the first survey of Waitemata Harbour – where present day Auckland stands. Was this the ship on which Thomas Bridgeman made his way to New Zealand? Once Thomas had arrived in New Zealand, he decided to stay, leaving his wife and children in Melbourne. It is thought that Sarah married a Joseph Foster in 1853, believing she was a widow. Thomas may have jumped ship in order to remain in New Zealand. Thomas, by now 34, made his way to Nelson on the South Island.

  • At the age of 36 years, Thomas Bridgeman married Jane Eyles, daughter of Daniel Eyles and Jane Primmer, on 1 April 1843 in New Zealand.
  • Between May 1843 and 1845 Thomas Bridgeman and Jane Eyles lived in Waimea, New Zealand.
  • Thomas Bridgeman's and Jane Eyles's first child Rebekah was born 1 February 1844 in Nelson, New Zealand.
  • On 17 February 1844 Thomas appeared on a jury list in Nelson. He was a joiner at the time and lived at Waimea.
  • Thomas Bridgeman immigrated to Sydney on 18 June 1845. He boarded the schooner "Star of China" at Port Nelson. It left for Australia on the 26th of May and arrived at Port Jackson. Jane & Rebekah departed from Port Nelson on the 26 September 1845 on the Comet. By the time she arrived in Sydney on 9 October Jane was almost eight months pregnant with their son Charles.
    During the four months it took for Jane to arrive in Australia, Thomas would have been looking for work. When Jane arrived it seems the family was immediately on the move again. Charles Walter Bridgeman he gave his place of birth as Gosswick (Gostwyck), New England when he married. Just how did the family get to Gostwyck from Sydney in the few weeks before his birth?
    Edward Gostwyck Cory (1799-1873) was granted over 2,000 acres of land fronting the Paterson River (in the Hunter Region) by Governor Brisbane in 1823. He had called this property Gostwyck. [Note: - Ironically the horse alleged stolen by William Gillis in 1851 belonged to Edward Cory]. Edward secured a second tract of grazing land near present day Uralla and about 20 km south of Armidale, which he also called Gostwyck. He quickly sold it to his partner William Dangar who in turn sold it to his brother Henry Dangar in 1832.
    How was it that Charles was born on 11 November, 1845 at Gostwyck, New England? A Richard Towns, who arrived in Sydney in March 1845, was bound to Henry Dangar in New England. His great, great grandson wrote: - “It is said that they travelled to Morpeth by boat, a trip which took about 11 hours, and then by horse and cart or bullock to New England, with the whole trip taking "almost a month".” A similar fate would have met Thomas and Jane. It does not seem possible that Jane travelled overland for “almost a month” and gave birth to Charles at Gostwyck in New England on 11 November 1845. Charles was then baptized three weeks later while his parents were living on the Clarence River. How did they make that trip in three weeks?
    It was possible, however, that Charles may have been born at the Gostwyck on the Paterson River as the property was accessible by boat via Newcastle and a journey from there to the Clarence River would only take a few days taking the coastal route. Wherever Charles was born, it is no doubt that his father had some connection to one of the Gostwyck properties.
    The family remained in the Clarence district, with Thomas working as a fisherman/carpenter from a houseboat according to family hearsay. When his daughter Jane was baptised in January, 1848 his occupation was given as a carpenter. At that time Grafton consisted of a small collection of building on the South side of the River. Further up the river, at Copmanhurst, the head of navigation, another settlement was being established. Thomas most likely travelled between the two settlements looking for work.
    An escaped convict Richard Craig had lead authorities who were interested in the great stands of cedar trees in the area, to the site of present day Grafton. He was a skilled bushman and in the 1830’s drove a flock of sheep from Ebor (between Armidale and Dorrigo) to The Settlement as Grafton was then known. In 1840 he bought 8,000 sheep down for J. R. Grose’s run at Copmanhurst. The sheep were ferried across the river on barge. His track through the bush to Grafton became known as the Craig Line, and was later used by many travellers. Was this how Thomas and Jane moved from Gostwyck near Uralla to Grafton?

    At some stage Thomas met George Kettel. George was the son of a William Kettel Esq, from Wateringbury in Kent. In 1841 George was granted a Depasturing License for the Moonbi run on the Peel River at Liverpool Plains (now on the main Highway between Tamworth and Armidale). The lease was later taken up by Henry Dangar (owner of Gostwyck, New England). On 1 November 1841, a Joseph Robinson was given a Ticket of Leave Passport 6 (41/485) to proceed to the Peel River under the service of Mr George Kettel on Moonbi and Tuckerman Sheep Stations near Tamworth. In 1847 George was at Peels River. He placed an advertisement in The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser advising that a horse had been lost or stolen from Peels River and that a reward of up to three pound would be paid for its return to either himself or Henry Dangar Esq.

    On 19 September 1848 The NSW Government Gazette advertised that Henry Dangar had claimed the lease of the Moonbi run. The run had grazing capacity for 8,000 sheep. The description of the run included a comment about “the hut occupied by Mr George Kettel”. Also in 1848, Henry Dangar’s brother John took up the Wallan run near present day Drillham on the Darling Downs. Perhaps as early as 1849, George Kettel took up the lease on Bogandilla Station, on the Darling Downs. Some references state it was part of the Wallan run, then owned by John Dangar. George would have needed to move his sheep from the Moonbi run since the lease was now owned by Henry Dangar. Family hearsay has it that “when Charles was about 5 years old his family in partnership with a Sea Captain Kettle took a flock of sheep and settled on land at Dulacca near Miles”. [Charles would have been four in early 1850]. Just what role Thomas Bridgeman played in this arrangement is uncertain. Certainly Thomas’s carpentry skills would have been valuable in establishing shelter for the party when they arrived at the station. But did he have his own flock of sheep? Making arrangements for such a trip would have taken some time and most likely involved acquiring a number of drays to carry food and goods. The Bridgeman family would have travelled to New England the quickest route being via the Craig Line. Perhaps the party made their arrangements for the trip at Gostwyck near Uralla, since the station was the largest in the region and certainly larger than George Kettel’s hut on Moombi. Kettle also had a close association with Henry Dangar, the owner of Gostwyck. Could this stay have left an impression on young Charles – who later stated he was born there?

    The most logical route for George Kettle to follow to Bognadilla near present day Dulacca, would have been via the water courses to ensure a good water supply for the sheep. After leaving Moombi the flock would have travelled to Gostwyck and then north. One possible route would have been to follow the Macintyre River from around what is now Inverell into Queensland (then NSW), and then its tributary Macintyre Brook. Frances Gillies was born at Meme , most likely a station on Macintyre Brook around present day Inglewood on 10 August 1850. It is possible that he was born during the trip north with George Kettel, meaning Jane would have made the overland trip during the latter stages of her pregnancy. From Macintyre Brook the flock may have reached Bogandilla in the spring of 1850 via the Condamine River. There was a Mihi Station close to Gostwych at Uralla.

    At some point during the family’s travels Rebecka died. No record of her death on the Clarence, during the overland trip or at Bogandilla has been found.
  • Again, according to family hearsay, “the family built a house on the property. They had a lot of trouble with aborigines ... one aborigine was very taken with young Jane Bridgeman who was a pretty child, and wanted to marry her .... he forced a fight with Mr Bridgeman twice and lost. Finally during a fight he (Bridgeman) was killed.... another version is that Mr Bridgeman died during a trip to Brisbane in order to record the land on which they had settled”. (Handwritten article on Thomas Bridgeman – Francis Walter Gillies descendant).

    It is not known when Thomas Bridgeman left Bogandilla. George Kettel was killed by aborigines on 5 January 1854 “his head was split open while he was dipping a billy of water from the creek to make tea”. The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser reported that two young aboriginals had been detained in connection with the murder. " Drayton, March 20 1854.—Since my last communication I have to inform you that two aboriginal natives have been arrested at Wallon, on a charge of cattle stealing, which natives have confessed that they were present at the murder of Mr. James George Kettel, of the Schanning, and at the taking away of his sheep; On Friday, the third of March, Mr. Ferrett sent down a messenger to Mr. Lester, J.P., of Terreyboo, for assistance, stating that there were strange blacks on his run, endangering the lives of his men, and likely to do him damage. Lieutenant Irving and Sub-Lieutenant Nicol, of the native police, were at Terreyboo at the time, when Mr. Nicol was immediately dispatched with six troopers. He returned on the Monday, bringing the two blacks in handcuffs, on a charge of killing and eating a bullock. These two men, who are both very young, and who have recently been in the employ of squatters in the neighbourhood, confess to have been present at the murder. There is, of course, no other evidence, nor could there be even if they were all arrested.—Correspondent of Englishman"

    Was it after George Kettel’s death that Thomas Bridgeman left Bogandilla to “record the land on which they had settled”? Did he leave Jane, four months pregnant on the station with the children Charles, Jane, Frank and Ellen (born 1852) and travel to Brisbane in early 1854? Whenever he left he did not return. Records indicate he made his way to South Australia where he married a third time.

  • At the age of 47 years and 6 months, Thomas Bridgeman married Sarah McAdam on 23 October 1854 in South Australia, Australia. She was a 32 year old spinster and he a 42 year old widowed carpenter. Witnesses to the marriage were Francis Kelly and Mary Ann Jolly.
  • Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah McAdam immigrated to New Zealand in 1855. Just when Thomas and Sarah arrived in New Zealand is uncertain. Family hearsay has it that they travelled on the ship Gil Blass from Melbourne on 3 September 1855, as steerage passengers under the name of Mr and Mrs Adams. Sarah would have been eight months pregnant at the time. (Taranaki Bridgeman family hearsay) has it that Thomas 'jumped ship' and was liable for severe punishment, if he had been caught . Does this refer to Thomas' leaving the HMS Britomart without permission way back in 1841 when Owen Stanley surveyed Auckland harbour?

    But why travel when your are 8 months pregnant, (although this is what Jane Eyles did when she sailed from Nelson in 1835), and why under an assumed name, only to revert to your correct name once you are settled. A James Adams was born in 1856 but to a Margret and James Adams. Three more children were born to Thomas and Sarah McAdam - Thomas Henry in Otago in 1857, South Island and twins Priscilla and Sarah in 1859, all under the name of Bridgeman. Sometime before 1880 the family moved to the New Plymouth district in the North Island where their daughter Sarah died in 1880.
  • In 1876,his wife, Sarah Newitt died in Australia. Her death certificate [reg no 743] shows she was 63 years old, born in Kent. No parents names were recorded.
  • On 9 June 1880,Thomas Bridgeman's daughter, Sarah Bridgeman was buried in Inglewood Cemetery at age 21.
  • On 31 July 1885,his wife, Sarah McAdam died in New Zealand.
  • On 22 March 1891,his wife, Jane Eyles died in Gowrie Little Plain, Queensland, Australia. Her cause of death was senile decay from which she had been suffering for 18 months. Dr Robers had been her Medical attendant. The informant of her death was her son-in-law John McGregor of Gowrie Little Plain. He stated her parents were Walter Daniel Eyles and Jane Hill and that she had been born in Somerset 63 years ago, having been 30 years in Queensland. Children of her first marriage were Charles Walter Bridgeman 43 and Gary 40 ? and of her second Francis 28, Ellen 26, Katherine 24, Alice 32, William Patrick 30, Agnes 28 and Edith 19 - obviously the ages for the first three children of this marriage are out by 10 years. She had two deceased children, daughters, by her first marriage.
  • Thomas Bridgeman died on 7 February 1893 in Moa District, New Zealand, at age 85. The death certificate showed his cause of death was hypostatic pneumonia and that he had been suffering for 14 days before his death. His living issue were two males aged 38 and 36, no females, he had married Sarah McAdam in Adelaide, South Australia when he was 48, had been born in Kent, and had been living in New Zealand for 50 years before his death. No details were given of his father or mother.
    Thomas had outlived his three wives and four of his eleven children.
  • He was buried on 9 February 1893 in New Zealand.

Children of Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah Newitt

Children of Thomas Bridgeman and Jane Eyles

Children of Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah McAdam

Thomas Henry Bridgeman

M, b. 25 February 1857, d. 18 November 1935
  • Thomas Henry Bridgeman was born on 25 February 1857 in Tolomairiro, Otago.
  • He was the son of Thomas Bridgeman and Sarah McAdam.
  • At the age of 27 years, Thomas Henry Bridgeman married Charlotte Ann Stockman in 1885 in New Zealand.
  • On 5 June 1890,Thomas Henry Bridgeman's son, George Henry Bridgeman was buried in Inglewood Cemetery.
  • On 30 December 1902,Thomas Henry Bridgeman's daughter, Ida May Bridgeman was buried in Inglewood Cemetery. Her parents lived in the Moa District.
  • On 6 February 1912,Thomas Henry Bridgeman's son, Robert Edgar Bridgeman was buried in Inglewood Cemetery. He was a school boy of Inglewood.
  • Thomas Henry Bridgeman's son, Reginald James Bridgeman was buried in Te Henui Cemetery. He was a sawmill hand.
  • In July 1918 Thomas Henry Bridgeman and Charlotte Ann Stockman lived in Vogletown. Their son Frank left Wellington on the 10 July 1918, aboard the "Tahiti" to sail to Plymouth during World War I. Both Frank and Harold who also served overseas returned to New Zealand at the end of the war.
  • Thomas Henry Bridgeman died on 18 November 1935 in New Zealand at age 78.
  • He was buried in Te Henui Cemetery. He was a farmer of Carrington Road.

Children of Thomas Henry Bridgeman and Charlotte Ann Stockman

Thomas Methven Bridgeman

M, b. 1864, d. 9 November 1935
  • Thomas Methven Bridgeman was born in 1864 in Victoria.
  • He was the son of Alexander Alfred Bridgeman and Agnes Methven.
  • At the age of 23 years, Thomas Methven Bridgeman married Martha Hester in 1887 in Victoria.
  • In July 1887 Thomas was granted a license for 105 acres, parish of Irrewillipe.
  • On 6 October 1935,his wife, Martha Hester died in Victoria.
  • Thomas Methven Bridgeman died on 9 November 1935 in Victoria.
  • He was buried on 11 November 1935 in Colac Cemetery.
  • He left a will. "Thomas Methven Bridgeman, late of Alvie, near Colac, dairy farmer, who died on November 9, left by will dated May 26 1925, real estate of a gross value of £7,715, and personal property of a gross value of £1,127 to his widow and children."

Children of Thomas Methven Bridgeman and Martha Hester

Thomas Methven Bridgeman

M, b. 1890, d. 7 July 1965
  • Thomas Methven Bridgeman was born in 1890 in Victoria.
  • He was the son of Thomas Methven Bridgeman and Martha Hester.
  • At the age of 28 years, Thomas Methven Bridgeman married Ina Constance Edwards in 1918 in Victoria.
  • In November 1919 Thomas Methven Bridgeman lived in Stoneleigh, Alvie.
  • The following article appeared in The Age on 6 March 1922. "MOTOR CYCLIST AWARDED £50
    DAMAGES.
    COLAC.— At Colac county court, before Judge Woinaraki, Thomas Methven Bridgeman, dairyman, of Alvie claimed from Murdoch M'Lennon, retired farmer, of
    Colac, £99 damages for personal injuries and damages to a motor cycle in a collision with defendant's motor car on Alvle-road on 14th September last. Evidence for plaintiff was that defendant, in turning from Red Rock-lane to the main road, was on the wrong side of the road, and plaintiff, who was riding a motor cycle, collided
    with him. The evidence for the defendant was that he was on his right side, and it was plaintiff who was at fault. His Honor
    gave an order for plaintiff for £50 10/6 pence, with costs. Defendant's counter claim for
    £40 damages to his car was dismissed"
    with costs.
  • He witnessed the near drowing of his son, Gordon Sutton Bridgeman on 23 November 1952. Gordon, a carpenter of Apollo Bay was almost drowned when a 15ft launch in which he was sailing was swept onto the reef in rough weather at Apollo Bay. Two other men in the boat were drowned. His father Thomas was watching from the cliff above and attempted to save the drowned men.
  • On 1 July 1954,his wife, Ina Constance Edwards died in Victoria.
  • Thomas Methven Bridgeman died on 7 July 1965 in Victoria.
  • He was buried on 10 July 1965 in Warncoort Cemetery.

Child of Thomas Methven Bridgeman and Ina Constance Edwards

Violet Victoria Bridgeman

F, b. 3 November 1899, d. 11 March 1981
  • Violet Victoria Bridgeman was born on 3 November 1899 in Queensland.
  • She was the daughter of Charles Daniel Bridgeman and Frances Myrah Ewins.
  • At the age of 21 years, Violet Victoria Bridgeman married Edward Harry Burley in 1921 in Queensland.
  • Violet Victoria Bridgeman died on 11 March 1981 in Queensland at age 81.

Walter Francis Bridgeman

M, b. 12 March 1893, d. 28 August 1982
  • Walter Francis Bridgeman was born on 12 March 1893 in Oakey, Queensland.
  • He was the son of Charles Daniel Bridgeman and Frances Myrah Ewins.
  • At the age of 45 years, Walter Francis Bridgeman married Jane Irene Thelma Anderson in 1939 in New South Wales.
  • Walter Francis Bridgeman died on 28 August 1982 in Queensland at age 89.
  • He was buried on 30 August 1982 in Tanderra Lawn Cemetery. SECTION 1 Section C Plot/Niche 12.

William James Bridgeman

M, b. 1881, d. 26 December 1950
  • William James Bridgeman was born in 1881 in New Zealand.
  • He was the son of James Adams Bridgeman and Mary Ann Rampton.
  • At the age of 28 years, William James Bridgeman married Annie Miller Wright in 1909 in New Zealand.
  • William James Bridgeman died on 26 December 1950 in New Zealand.
  • He was buried on 29 December 1950 in Te Henui Cemetery. He lived at 565 Mission Hill, New Plymouth and was a farmer.

Child of William James Bridgeman and Annie Miller Wright

George Bridges

M, b. 1904, d. 7 August 1988

George Bridges

M, b. 1878, d. 14 May 1944
  • George Bridges was born in 1878 in Queensland. He was the son of William Bridges and Frances Gayton.
  • At the age of 25 years, George Bridges married Esther Garrett, daughter of Isaac Garrett and Ann Jane Hamilton, in 1903 in Queensland.
  • George Bridges and Esther Garrett appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1903 living at Spring Bluff. George was a labourer.
  • George Bridges and Esther Garrett appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1913 living at Highfields. George was a railway employee.
  • George Bridges and Esther Garrett appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1925 living at Highfields. George was a railway employee.
  • George Bridges died on 14 May 1944 in Queensland.
  • He was buried on 15 May 1944 in Drayton & Toowoomba Cemetery.

Child of George Bridges and Esther Garrett

Annie Bridson

F, b. circa 1860, d. 11 May 1929
  • Annie Bridson was born circa 1860. She was the daughter of Thomas Bridson and Annie.
  • Annie Bridson married Thomas Alexander Neilson circa 1884.
  • Annie Bridson witnessed the burial of Thomas Alexander Neilson on 13 June 1895 in Toowoomba & Drayton Cemetery.
  • Annie Bridson and Thomas Alexander Neilson appeared on the Electoral Roll in 1903 living at Queen Street, Crow's Nest. Thomas was a farmer.
  • In 1906,Annie Bridson's son, William Archibald Neilson was buried in Crow's Nest Cemetery. UNIT-00N-0003.
  • Annie Bridson died on 11 May 1929 in Queensland.
  • She was buried in Crow's Nest Cemetery.

Children of Annie Bridson and Thomas Alexander Neilson

Elizabeth Brien

F, b. September 1828, d. 31 May 1868
  • Elizabeth Brien was born in September 1828 in Offaly, Ireland. She was the daughter of Thomas Brien and Betsy Farrell.
  • At the age of 28 years and 5 months, Elizabeth Brien married George Moran on 12 February 1857 in County Offaly, Ireland.
  • Elizabeth Brien and George Moran immigrated to Queensland around 1864. George 30, Eliza 28, travelled with their three children Michael aged 6, Elizabeth 5 and George18 months. The index to the Register of Immigrants shows the family arrived on 26 May 1864 and were sponsered by Thomas Bryan (Brien) - Eliza's brother, but the ship they travelled on has not yet been found. Thomas wasn't listed on the Sponsered immigration index with his siblings but this may have been becasuse he was not born at the time of sponsorship.
  • Elizabeth Brien died on 31 May 1868 in Queensland at age 39.
  • She was buried on 1 June 1868 in Drayton & Toowoomba Cemetery.
  • George and Elizabeth's sons Michael, George and Thomas all worked on Emu Creek Station until Thomas, still a teenager, went to Clermont with a mob of horses and didn't return.

Children of Elizabeth Brien and George Moran